Aric Crabb / Bay Area News Group

Even with new disclosure law, fight continues to unseal California’s secret police files

One had sex in the front seat of his squad car , another stole thousands of bullets . Others used force illegally, cavorted with sex workers, lied in reports and trumped up charges. None of those police officers were prosecuted. These are just some of the revelations made public in the first months of a new state of police transparency in California. A new state law, Senate Bill 1421, broke down a wall of secrecy built up since the 1970s that blocked public access to the most serious police misconduct and deadly use-of-force information.

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NPR

Rebuilding Paradise, One New Home At A Time

In the northern California foothills, the town of Paradise was almost completely destroyed by last fall's Camp Fire. But sprinkled across the ruins, there are now a few signs of life as homeowners and contractors begin the rebuilding process. Jim and Colleen Corner's place looks like a post-apocalyptic homestead. The neighborhood's been depopulated. Block after block of ruins. Torched vehicles. Hulking pines, many dead, have yet to topple. At the apex of a semi-circular driveway, translucent,...

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Issues & Ideas: SLO growth, economic vitality and wildflowers

5 hours ago

On this week's Issues & Ideas, we hear about the Hourglass Project, a new economic vitality venture aimed at bringing future jobs and industries to San Luis Obispo County. We'll also hear two sides of the ongoing conversation about downtown San Luis Obispo, and what should be done to encourage a wide-range of businesses while nurturing the city's unique characteristics. UCSB neuroscientist Kenneth Kosik talks about studying a genetic mutation that causes early-onset Alzheimer's disease, and our colleagues at KCRW explore what's behind California's current wildflower super bloom, and where you can see carpets of spring flowers. 

Parents bribing, cheating, bullying and lying—all in the name of wanting what's best for their children. Governments bribe, lie, cheat and bully—all in the name of wanting what's best for their citizens. Children lie, cheat, bully and steal because they lack role models teaching them anything different. Tune in for a conversation with Elizabeth Barrett, the Reluctant Therapist, about the collapse of social conformity and the rise of the enlightened outliers. Maybe the unveiling of sweeping universal inequities will be the path that puts us in the best place for growth and change.

Even with new disclosure law, fight continues to unseal California’s secret police files

Mar 19, 2019
Aric Crabb / Bay Area News Group

One had sex in the front seat of his squad car, another stole thousands of bullets. Others used force illegally, cavorted with sex workers, lied in reports and trumped up charges.

None of those police officers were prosecuted.

These are just some of the revelations made public in the first months of a new state of police transparency in California. A new state law, Senate Bill 1421, broke down a wall of secrecy built up since the 1970s that blocked public access to the most serious police misconduct and deadly use-of-force information.

Courtesy of Five Cities Fire Authority

At the end of February, when Arroyo Grande city staff floated the idea of leaving the Five Cities Fire Authority (FCFA) in San Luis Obispo County, it threatened the future of fire services for the city, as well as Oceano and Grover Beach. This week, the Arroyo Grande city council decided the fire department shouldn’t disband yet. And now all three communities served by the FCFA—Arroyo Grande, Oceano and Grover Beach—have six months to come up with funding plan all agree on.

VCFD

Southern California Edison power lines touching each other in strong winds definitely started the Thomas Fire, according to a report released Wednesday by the Ventura County Fire Department.

Flickr/Håkan Dahlström

As part of a plan to increase affordable housing, this week San Luis Obispo County officials took some first steps: passing higher development fees on new homes and streamlining the environmental permitting process in an effort to get homes built faster. Not everyone was happy about it, but did agree the county needs more housing stock. 

Courtesy of the National Coalition for Women and Girls in Education (NCWGE)

Title IX is a federal law that is part of the Education Amendments Act of 1972. Its goal is to prohibit discrimination at educational institutions that receive federal funding. One area Title IX presents itself on college campuses is in addressing allegations of sexual misconduct. A recent California court ruling has public universities scrambing to rewrite rules for how these investigations are conducted, but the coming changes have some administrators and students concerned. To learn more, KCBX's Tyler Pratt sat down with San Luis Obispo Tribune reporter Monica Vaughan, who's been covering this issue. 

Randol White/KCBX

On Wednesday, March 13, the Diablo Canyon Decommissioning Engagement Panel is hosting a public hearing on the management—over the coming decades—of the spent, radioactive nuclear fuel generated at Diablo Canyon Power Plant. The hearing will take place in board chambers at the downtown SLO government center at 1055 Monterey Street from 6 to 10 p.m. The hearing will also be aired on the SLO-SPAN network.

Mark Hogan/creative commons

This month San Luis Obispo will host a housing summit, featuring the state lawmaker behind a push to override local zoning laws and build high-density housing near centers of public transportation and jobs. And recently San Luis Obispo County officials signed an agreement with Central Coast builders and nonprofits dedicating themselves to building a lot more affordable housing in the coming years.

What’s not being talked about is how the planned construction is actually going to get done, when there currently are not enough construction workers to build all those new housing units.

California Air Resources Board

What better way to decompress from a stressful federal government job than by trekking 2,600 miles on foot from Mexico to Canada?

That’s what Jared Blumenfeld, the new head of the California Environmental Protection Agency, did three years ago, setting out on the arduous and beloved Pacific Crest Trail that traces California’s searing deserts, rugged mountains and sparkling coastline. Turns out the dust on his boots afforded him just the perspective he needed to take on the job Gov. Gavin Newsom gave him in January.

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