California Will Release Up To 8,000 Prisoners Due To Coronavirus

California will release up to 8,000 prisoners this summer in an effort to create more space and prevent the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 in prisons. News of the plan comes after more than a third of the inmates and staff at the San Quentin State Prison in the San Francisco Bay Area tested positive for the coronavirus . Anyone who is eligible for release will be tested for the coronavirus within seven days of their return to society, the California Department of Corrections...

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NPR

More Than 20 U.S. States Now Require Face Masks In Public

More than 20 states have now issued orders requiring people to wear face masks in public as the rate of new coronavirus cases surges to record heights in parts of the United States. The U.S. has recorded more than 1 million coronavirus infections over the past month alone, pushing the number of confirmed cases past the 3 million mark this week. If more Americans cover their faces to prevent spreading the coronavirus, tens of thousands of COVID-19 deaths could be prevented in the coming months...

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California faced a crisis in affordable housing even before COVID-19, so how has the pandemic affected the situation? During shelter at home orders, and the continued restrictions, many low-income tenants have faced job and income loss that have prevented them from paying rent, buying food and accessing health care.  Join Fred Munroe as he speaks with John Fowler, president and CEO with Peoples’ Self-Help Housing (PSHH) and Morgen Benevedo, PSHH's director of multifamily housing, as they discuss how COVID-19 is affecting affordable housing, including issues such as increase in need, resident safety, a decrease in production and capitalization problems for the future. Plus, what role the government has, and strategies for increasing affordable housing amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

MBARI 2012

Far below the surface of the Pacific Ocean is a lab run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, MBARI. From here, scientists have been studying deep-sea communities, and they’ve been at it now for over 30 years. 

Christie OHara

Over the span of less than a month, the city of San Luis Obispo spent over a quarter million dollars to police recent demonstrations in response to the death of George Floyd and in support of the Black Lives Matter movement.

A fire in Paso Robles on June 22 destroyed two homes, damaged nine others and forced a third of the city to evacuate. The nonfatal wildfire started in a small stretch of the Salinas River, in an area where city officials consider dry grasses and brush an ongoing fire danger.

Since mid-June, Santa Barbara’s tourism marketing branch has been advertising the city as “Open for Travel,” an action which has brought some criticism.

Courtesy of Facebook

Grover Beach police are searching for the vandal or vandals who spray-painted racist graffiti along the outside walls of a local elementary school.

How we identify, name and introduce ourselves can be an action of empowerment and inclusion—or, if we are not careful with our language, it can also be a source a disconnection and 'otherness.' Meeting each other where we are and as who we are is an important bridge to understanding and care. Tune in for a conversation with The Reluctant Therapist and guest hosts Aaliyah Sade and David Gudiel about the many ways that the helping professions fail to recognize or address the impact of institutional and systemic issues on the mental health and well-being of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) communities. This is the kick-off for BIPOC mental health awareness month and the beginning of a series of discussions and topics chosen and lead by this heart-centered, activist, artistic, passionate couple of recent Gen Z college graduates.

Angel Russell/KCBX

Choosing not to–or forgetting to–wear a mask in parts of California could cost you. The city of Monterey is now citing people not wearing masks, and the city of Arroyo Grande is eyeing a similar ordinance.

Moving Picture World

Correspondent Tom Wilmer visits with Santa Barbara historian Betsy J. Green about Santa Barbara’s Flying A Studios, which was producing movies before the advent of Hollywood. Green also shares insights about the 1918 flu epidemic in Santa Barbara, and how the 1925 earthquake that destroyed numerous buildings spurred the city to mandate all city-core reconstruction projects to employ California Mission-Revival architectural motifs.

All bars across San Luis Obispo County are now ordered to close for the weekend, to "avoid large congregations of individuals in close proximity within a confined space."

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