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Central Coast News

KCBX News Update: Deltopia safety measures in place, California eviction protections extended and annual Tomato Spectacular underway

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Santa Barbara County Sheriff's Department
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The annual Deltopia event often draws crowds of thousands to the streets of Isla Vista.

Deltopia Safety Plans

Santa Barbara County officials and UC Santa Barbara are implementing a number of safety measures this weekend in expectation of Deltopia, the annual event that brings tens of thousands of party goers to Isla Vista.

Campus beaches are closed through Sunday and no overnight visitors will be allowed in any university-owned housing. Unless vehicles are properly permitted, the campus will be closed to overnight visitor parking through Sunday.

Between the hours of 6 p.m. and 7 a.m., loud music is prohibited at Isla Vista residences. Law enforcement will be on patrol and, if music can be heard outside of a home, residences could receive a fine of $500.

Eviction Protections Extended

Some California eviction protections were extended past the March 31 expiration date. Now through June 30, tenants who completed an application for rent relief on or before March 31, cannot be evicted for unpaid rent that was due before April 1 of this year.

Any tenants who have been approved for rent relief but are still waiting for the money to be disbursed by the state can also ask the court to stop an eviction for unpaid rent due before April 1.

San Luis Obispo tenants who need help filing a response to an eviction lawsuit can contact the nonprofit SLO Legal Assistance Foundation at (805) 543-5140 or email intake@slolaf.org.

Tomato Spectacular

Cal Poly’s annual Tomato Spectacular plant sale began Friday and will continue for three more days this month on April 2, 15 and 16 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Horticulture Unit near the Poly Plant Shop.

The event showcases 75 different types of tomato plants and is run by students under the supervision of the university’s College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences.

The students grew more than 3,000 tomato plants from seeds this year and tended to them in the university’s greenhouses.

Ryan Schrader is a fourth-year agricultural and environmental plant sciences major and the lead grower for the event. He said running the event gives students experience in not only growing the plants, but also running a real-life sales event.

"So it’s getting you industry experience in the sense that you have to find out how to find all the products you need and how to market it as well," Schrader said.

Susan Snyder is a professor in the Horticulture and Crop Science department and oversees the plant growing and the Tomato Spectacular, which she said is a huge benefit for students going into fields like agriculture.

“I want them to get the experience with that hands-on, learn-by-doing Cal Poly model,“ Snyder said.

Plants are $8 and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Customers are encouraged to bring boxes or wagons to transport plants.