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Thousands of wild horses still roam public lands in Western states. The government captures a few hundred each year to be tamed and sold at auction. The tamers are prison inmates. They've inspired a new film, a drama called "The Mustang." Here's critic Bob Mondello.

CFPB chief presents agenda to Senate committee

Mar 15, 2019

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s new director, Kathy Kraninger, is scheduled to appear before the Republican-run Senate Banking Committee this week to give a rundown of the agency’s policy agenda. It’s likely to be a different hearing from the one Kraninger faced earlier in the House, where Democrats grilled her about plans to roll back Obama-era protections against predatory payday lending.

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Episode #1912

Mar 15, 2019

24 hours at the border, and a look at a shelter for stranded youth in Tijuana.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has had a light presence when it comes to the Democratic Republic of Congo's Ebola outbreak. But now that is changing.

Dr. Robert Redfield, the CDC director, tells NPR that he'll be assigning about a dozen health experts to work in the DRC for a year and positioning at least some of them much closer to the epicenter than earlier teams.

North Korea is considering breaking off negotiations with the U.S. and resuming nuclear and missile tests, following last month's summit in Vietnam that ended early and without an agreement, a government official said.

Vice Foreign Minister Choe Son Hui told diplomats and reporters in Pyongyang on Friday that North Korea was disappointed with the outcome of negotiations between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, and that Kim would soon decide whether to end his country's voluntary moratorium on testing missiles and nuclear weapons.

Updated at 4:51 p.m. ET

Tens of thousands of students around the world skipped school school Friday to protest inaction on climate change. It was one of the largest turnouts so far in a months long movement that included the U.S. for the first time, in an event organizers call the "U.S. Youth Climate Strike."

Updated at 7:30 a.m. ET Saturday

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said she would seek a change in her country's gun laws after at least one man opened fire during afternoon prayers Friday and killed at least 49 people at two mosques in Christchurch.

"Our gun laws will change," Ardern declared in a news conference Saturday morning local time.

The violent attack struck at the very heart of New Zealand, a country that prides itself on being both peaceful and diverse.

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Left: Ga'verri Jones-Collins, Charleston's grandson, 10, sits for a portrait below an air-brush painting of his great grandfather. Right: A comb Carlton and Juanita purchased in South of The Border, South Carolina, while traveling.
Shuran Huang

When you walk into Collin's Barber & Beauty Shop, it feels like home.

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At least 49 people are dead following a mass shooting on two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. Multiple suspects are in custody.

Updated at 3:45 p.m. ET

Members of Washington's elite legal community decried the "increasing politicization" of the justice system at a particularly sensitive time: as the special counsel probe of Russian election interference edges toward a conclusion.

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I want to bring in another voice here. It is Ben Collins, who reports on online extremism for NBC News.

Hi there, Ben.

BEN COLLINS: Hey. How you doing?

Brexit has convulsed the United Kingdom like no other political event in decades, but it can be hard to follow the day-to-day machinations. At the end of a chaotic week, here's what to know.

How different are things now for the U.K. than they were on Monday?

Pizzagate: A Slice of Fake News

Mar 15, 2019

As the investigation into foreign influence in the 2016 election heats up, we bring you a story of how fake news starts, snowballs and sometimes erupts into gunfire. This story takes us into the world of right-wing Twitter trolls, pro-Trump political operatives and fake-news profiteers from St. Louis to Macedonia. This collaboration with Rolling Stone and Type Investigations was originally broadcast Nov. 18, 2017.

Tesla unveils a new SUV, the Model Y

Mar 15, 2019

At a launch party in Los Angeles last night, Tesla revealed what could be its most important vehicle yet. The Model Y is a small, all-electric SUV, that looks a lot like a taller version of the Model 3 sedan.

Now that earnings season is over, what are investors focusing on? Two big names depart at Facebook. Seven states have legalized sports gambling, but they shouldn't expect a windfall this March Madness. Volkswagen is in hot water with the SEC over its emissions fraud. Plus, we travel to Copenhagen, where one hotel is helping drug addicts with training, jobs and recovery.

Today's show is sponsored by VistaprintAmazon Web Services and Brother Printers.

Troika Laundromat used shell companies to hide billions, report says

Mar 15, 2019

An alleged money laundering scheme that moved billions of dollars from Russia into the West through shell companies is now mushrooming to implicate banks in Western Europe, including Denmark and Austria. The Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project says that the Troika Laundromat was a system that allowed Russian oligarchs and politicians to hide dirty money through complex banking transactions.

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If you've ever been tempted to make a rude gesture at a police officer, you can rest assured that the Constitution protects your right to do so, a federal appeals court says.

This week in Idaho, some voters are speaking out against a bill that would make it harder for citizens to get issues they care about on the ballot – anything from Medicaid expansion to marijuana.

Twenty-six states allow for voter-driven initiatives but as that process becomes more popular, lawmakers from Maine to Utah and Idaho believe it's time to pull it back.

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Two afternoons a week, Mikala Tardy walks six blocks from Eastern High School to Payne Elementary School, not far from Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.

She signs in at the front desk just after 3:30 p.m. and makes her way to a classroom, where she'll be tutoring second- and third-graders who are full of energy after the school day.

Today, Mikala and three students work through an exercise about communities and the building blocks that create them. They learn how to spell people and playground — two essential components of any community, they decide.

Late last year, retired Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor issued a statement announcing that she had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. It was a poignant moment, a reminder that for decades O'Connor was seen as the most powerful woman in America.

Russia's dirty laundry

Mar 15, 2019

The British parliament has voted to postpone the March 29 Brexit deadline. Will the European Union agree to the extension, and what happens either way? Tesla reveals its Model Y SUV. Plus, we take a look at the Russian financial fraud scheme known as the "Troika Laundromat".

Today's show is sponsored by VistaprintAmazon Web Services and Brother Printers.

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