bars

All bars across San Luis Obispo County are now ordered to close for the weekend, to "avoid large congregations of individuals in close proximity within a confined space."

Angel Russell/KCBX News

Bars, breweries and wine tasting venues are closing their doors Thursday night in San Luis Obispo after the city issued temporary restrictions for the 4th of July holiday.

Marco Bruschi

Younger adults are contributing to the rise in COVID-19 cases in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties, and a spike in confirmed cases statewide has led California's governor to reinstate shut-down orders for all bars, pubs and brewpubs. And while not ordered to do so, San Luis Obispo city officials announced Wednesday that the city's bars must too close as of July 2. 

MARELBU/wikimedia commons

Saint Patrick’s Day is upon us and in San Luis Obispo, that usually means crowds of revelers and Cal Poly students hitting the downtown bars and restaurants for some serious partying, starting early in the morning. But in this new reality of the coronavirus pandemic, that’s not going to be the case this year.

Governor Gavin Newsom announced Sunday afternoon he is directing Californians aged 65-and-older and the chronically ill to stay home and self-isolate in the face of widening transmission of the coronavirus statewide. Officials are barring visits to hospitals and senior centers, except for end-of-life visits.

Additionally, all bars, nightclubs, wineries and brewpubs are to close, "for now," Newsom said.

MARELBU/wikimedia commons

This week we’re airing two recent studio interviews, offering different perspectives on downtown San Luis Obispo. Lately, there's a been a lot of civic conversation about the best path forward to nurture a vibrant, thriving downtown. 

Cal Poly Student Affairs, the Mayor of San Luis Obispo, the Downtown Association, and local bar owners have all come to an agreement regarding the opening hours for local watering holes the mornings of graduation—they'll remain at 6 a.m.

Dominic Tartaglia, executive director of the Downtown Association, says the situation will be used as a way to educate students on responsible drinking. Cal Poly plans to roll out that campaign over the next few weeks.

Flickr member youngthousands

There is a push to help control the number of drunk Cal Poly students attending this year's morning graduation ceremonies.

San Luis Obispo Mayor Jan Marx says she was asked by leaders on campus to help organize a discussion with local bar owners. At issue, is the tradition of students hitting the bars very early on graduation morning and then, in some cases, being too inebriated to follow through with their ceremony.

The mayor says in some cases the graduates can't walk, disrupt the ceremony, and have even vomited on themselves.

Controversial 'Glove Law' faces likely change

Apr 1, 2014
Shannan Baumann

California restaurants and bars may be in luck after a unanimous vote last week in favor of Assembly Bill 2130.

The bill is an amendment to the Retail Food Safety Bill, commonly referred to as the "Glove Law," which went into effect this January. According to Assemblyman Dr. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), who wrote the initial legislation and the bill in consideration, the law was intended to be a non-controversial update to the existing food safety code.