Chattanooga

Thomas Wilmer

JUL 19, 2016

The International Towing and Recovery Museum in ChattanoogaTennessee features famous tow trucks, including the world’s largest wrecker, a WWII tank recovery tow truck, and the world’s oldest tow truck. 

But equally engaging is the Tow Truck Wall of Fame honoring tow truck industry legends from around the world. Most touching is the Wall of The Fallen out front, with a large bronze statue of a driver lifting a mother and child from a nearly submerged car. The Wall of the Fallen proudly lists 389 tow-truck drivers killed in the line of duty around the world. America’s first tow truck was built in 1916, about three miles away from the museum, at the Ernest Holmes Company.

Join correspondent Tom Wilmer in Chattanooga, Tennessee for a visit with the International Towing & Recovery Truck Museum Executive Director, Angela Roper. This show was originally published July 19, 2016 and is reshared as a best-of-the-best radio travel show celebrating the 31st anniversary of Journeys of Discovery with Tom Wilmer's on-air and digital media podcasts.

Thomas Wilmer

 Join correspondent Tom Wilmer reporting from Chickamauga National Military Park at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia for a conversation with U.S. National Park Ranger Lee White. Specializing in the human aspects of the Civil War soldiers, Ranger White shares insights about what they ate, the clothes and boots they wore, the diseases that killed them by the thousands, and their emotional state of being as documented in their poignant letters home. 

Tourists from around the world love See Rock City's family style activities
Tom Wilmer

Nestled on a ridge-top with dramatic vistas spanning seven states, Rock City started in the late 1920s as a Ma and Pa miniature golf course nestled in a garden setting. Barns across the Midwest were painted with large black and White “See Rock City” during the 1930s to spur tourists--today more than 100 barns are still adorned. Tourists now come in droves from around the world to savor See Rock City's Fairyland Caverns, Mother Goose Village, shops, and restaurants,live musical performances, and dramatic vistas from Lover Leap.

KCBX

Willy Mays, Jackie Robinson, Bessie Smith—"The Empress of the Blues", Dr. Martin Luther King and his wife Coretta, Samuel L. Jackson, Dr. Emma Wheeler, and pro football player Reggie White—they all have one thing in common, and that’s their connection with the Tennessee town of Chattanooga.

Thomas Wilmer

 Dunlap, Tennessee is just a half hour drive from Chattanooga, but it’s a world apart.

For close to a century, coal mining was the driver here in the rural community of Dunlap, Tennessee, but by the early 1990's the coal industry was history. The old coke ovens, built in 1902 remain as decaying relics of a time when more than 400 locals were employed in the mines.

Thomas Wilmer

  The Tennessee Valley Railroad Museum (TVRM) in Chattanooga, Tennessee offers daily excursions along an historic route that first opened to rail traffic back in 1858.

It was the railroad’s strategic importance that led to the Civil War Battle of Chickamauga that was fought here back in the fall of 1863. 

Thomas Wilmer

  The International Towing and Recovery Museum in Chattanooga, Tennessee features famous tow trucks, including the world’s largest wrecker, a WWII tank recovery tow truck, and the world’s oldest tow truck. 

Thomas Wilmer

Christopher Young, National Park Service Resource Education Specialist at Chickamauga National Military Park at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia talks about the Civil War battle in the fall of 1863 at Chickamauga on the outskirts of Chattanooga, Tennessee.

212 Market

Sisters, Sally and Susan Moses and their mom, Maggie had a vision to open a trend-setting restaurant in downtown Chattanooga, Tennessee

The family envisioned a farm-to-table model, about two-decades before the concept became a nationwide trend.

Thomas Wilmer

Correspondent Tom Wilmer reports from Chattanooga. Come along and join the conversation with passionate music lover, Mary Howard Ade. She moved here from New York City to work as the Chattanooga Convention & Visitors Bureau’s full-time Music Marketing Manager

Live music has been an integral ingredient in the cultural fabric of Chattanooga since the founding of the riverfront town in 1839. Bessie Smith, born in Chattanooga in 1892, was fondly nicknamed "Empress of the Blues" and became America’s #1 blues performer throughout the 1920s and 30s.