climate change

Courtesy: Alta Colina

Harvest season for wine grapes in Paso Robles is underway, and locals in the industry say it’s going well despite the persisting impacts of drought.

Wine experts say years of continuing drought and wildfire exacerbated by climate change has impacted grape yield and harvest.

Last year, longer heat waves paired with smoke affected the fruit quality in Paso Robles. Molly Lonborg is the Winemaker at Alta Colina in Paso Robles. She said this year, things are off to a good start.

New research led by scientists at UC Santa Barbara and the University of Washington suggests Western wildfires are likely to intensify over the next 10 years before experiencing a gradual decline.

Credit: Rachel Showalter

Wild beavers play a critical role in the fight against climate change by creating wetlands that combat drought and wildfire.

Hayley Crowell

Now, in the heat of summer, warmer temperatures on the Central may not be comfortable for everyone.

But, a new study by a team of Cal Poly researchers found that Pacific rattlesnakes actually enjoy warmer temperatures and are more suited to conditions brought on by climate change.

The Santa Barbara City Council voted unanimously July 20 to prohibit natural gas in all new construction in the city.

Courtesy of White Buffalo Land Trust

Environmental nonprofit White Buffalo Land Trust acquired a 1,000-acre ranch in Santa Barbara that it will use to create a research and education center focused on regenerative agriculture.

Erika Mahoney

On this edition of Issues & ideas, you’ll hear about the UC Santa Barbara marine scientists who are currently on an international expedition to help them understand how the ocean will respond to climate change. The western monarch butterfly’s population has declined 99% percent since the 1980s, but you can learn to help them recover in your own garden. We’ll hear from Santa Barbara emergency physician Dr. Jason Prystowsky about what could be done to foster trust between marginalized communities and medical institutions. Father Ian takes us with him as he learns about Olive leaf Tea. Finally, members of The Molly Ringwald Project, a popular local 80s dance band, talk about performing again after the pandemic.

Photo: Deborah Steinberg / NASA.gov

UC Santa Barbara marine scientists are currently on an international expedition to study the ocean’s carbon cycle. The scientists say the data will help them to understand how the ocean is going to respond to climate change.

Scientists around the world agree that pollution, habitat destruction, and over-exploitation of natural resources have created a climate emergency that threatens great harm to human health, wellbeing, and livelihoods. Here at home in California and on the Central Coast, we are experiencing those effects first hand. The U.S. drought monitor reports approximately more than half of California is already experiencing a severe drought, and that we are primed for a severe 2021 fire season. And while climate change is a threat to everyone’s health and well-being, some groups—socially and economically disadvantaged ones—face the greatest risks. So, what can we do?

Join us as we continue our celebration of Earth Month! Join Fred Munroe as he speaks with an array of Central Coast organizations working on ways to protect and restore the environment, combat the climate crisis, and pursue environmental justice for communities that are most vulnerable. Fred will talk with Mary Ciesinski with EcoSLO, Lexi Bell with The Morro Bay National Estuary Program, Eric Veium with The San Luis Obispo Climate Coalition, and Lucas Zucker and Rebeca Garcia with Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE) about the important work they are doing around these issues and how you can help create a better future and save the earth. 

The theme for Earth Day 2021 is Restore Our Earth, which focuses on natural processes, emerging green technologies, and innovative thinking that can restore the world’s ecosystems. Understanding the ocean’s role in climate change and how we approach business and conservation associated with the oceans are a critical part of the solution to the climate crisis.

Join us in a celebration of Earth Day, as host Kris Kington-Barker speaks with Benjamin Ruttenberg, Associate Professor in the Biological Sciences Department at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and director of the Center for Coastal Marine Sciences. They will discuss the threat that climate change poses to our oceans, marine life, and coastal communities, as well as talk about how a move toward a blue economy can help.

 

  Voices of the Earth deals with the troubled relationship between humans and the natural world. Compiled by Charles Junkerman and Rush Rehm Voices of the Earth brings together some of the greatest environmental voices from across the centuries to celebrate the anniversary of Earth Day. With a cast of 90 different characters – poets, naturalists, scientists, politicos, deniers, and heroes, Voices of the Earth presents a kaleidoscope of views on the earth we inhabit, and the existential crisis we face.

Join host Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with Rush Rehm, Professor, Theater and Performance Studies, and Classics, Stanford University and Artistic Director, Stanford Repertory Theater (SRT), and Magnus Toren, Executive Director of the Henry Miller Memorial Library in Big Sur about this inspiring work and its call to action.

Matt McKechnie

April 7 is International Beaver Day and the San Luis Obispo Beaver Brigade is celebrating this year by participating in the first free, virtual California Beaver Summit.

Since 1970, the Community Environmental Council (CEC) has incubated and innovated real life environmental solutions that directly affect the California Central Coast. Their current work advances rapid and equitable solutions to the climate crisis – including ambitious zero carbon goals, drawdown of excess carbon, and protection against the impacts of climate change. At CEC, building community resilience is at the center of everything they do. 

City of SB CWPP

 

California's 2020 wildfire season burned more than four million acres and broke numerous records for increased size and intensity, according to a recent report from the state’s Forest Management Task Force.

Beth Thornton

 

Two congress members from the Central Coast and a senator from Oregon are calling for endangered species protections for the monarch butterfly. Western Monarch butterflies spend their winter months on the coast of California. They cling to eucalyptus trees in bright clusters of orange and black, but today very few can be found.

pixnio.com

Intending to take action against global warming, 32 California cities have passed bans on natural gas in new buildings. This week city officials in Santa Barbara are looking at passing similar regulations.

In this episode of Issues & Ideas, we learn about a project aimed at addressing climate change by planting trees in Stockton and renewing urban forests. A new law could help many musicians and performers in California once venues reopen. You’ll hear about a local company called Comevo that experienced success during the pandemic and stepped up to help others. The San Luis Obispo County Library system has faced challenges this past year, but continues to move forward with innovations and a lot of hard work. And finally, a local resident has been planting lots of fig trees from cuttings, and we’ll share some ideas about gardening, cooking and eating figs.

CA King Tides Project

King tides are the year’s highest and lowest tides, occurring when there is alignment of the gravitational pull between the sun, moon and Earth. California’s coast is seeing king tides this week—with more on the way in December and January—and with them a chance to participate in a statewide science project.

In this edition of Issues & Ideas—protests, demonstrations and rallies continue across the Central Coast and nation, and one of the many issues brought into the spotlight is the racism that has shaped our cities over the past several decades, and how that racism intersects with climate change. We have an interview with Peter Rupert, director of the Economic Forecast Project at UC Santa Barbara, an initiative involved in Santa Barbara County's reopening after the pandemic shutdown. Consuelo Muets, CEO of SPOKES—which, for a membership fee, provides resources for nonprofits—talks with guests from OperaSLO and the Clark Center for the Performing Arts in Arroyo Grande. And finally, contributor Tom Wilmer traveled to Arkansas in 2016 and spoke with Robin White, superintendent of the National Park Service's Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site. Given the national conversation at the moment, we're listening again to White's perspective. 

Flickr/Anita Ritenour

A Central Coast professor is asking surfers to serve as citizen scientists on February 8 and 9, during the final king tide of this season.

King tides are an annual winter occurrence, when the combination of a full moon and Earth’s closer proximity to the sun cause tides that are both higher and lower than the normal tidal range.

San Luis Obispo's new effort to become carbon neutral by 2035 is among the most ambitious greenhouse gas emissions reduction targets in the nation. But it’s not just about emissions, it’s about health, equity, economy, community well-being, and sharing our lessons with the state, the nation, and the world. Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with San Luis Obispo sustainabily managers Chris Read and Bob Hill, San Luis Obispo Climate Coalition's Justin Bradshaw and Monterey Bay Community Power spokesperson J.R.

Earth Day is a global event each year, beginning on April 22, 1970, when millions of people took to the streets to protest the negative impacts of 150 years of industrial development. Today more than 1 billion people in 192 countries take part in what is the largest civic-focused day of action in the world. It is a day of political action and civic participation celebrated by individuals, children, families, business, community leaders, governments and many others.

Flickr user Duanephoto99

What will California's climate feel like in 60 years? For many urban areas, possibly just like much warmer and drier areas of Mexico. That’s according to a new interactive map based on global climate data released this week, which features several Central Coast cities.

Flickr/Ben Klocek

More than 100 local elected officials across California sent a letter to Governor Jerry Brown this week calling for a statewide plan “to phase out oil and gas drilling.” The letter included names of some recognizable Central Coast public figures.

Broadcast date: 3/8/2018

SunWork Renewable Energy Projects is a small 501(c)(3) nonprofit with a mission to help make solar more affordable and widespread with the help of trained volunteers. SunWork pushes to change the shape of our energy landscape, they do this by providing opportunities to individuals to make a meaningful impact on the environmental problems we face as a community. SunWork’s philosophy is to empower people to tackle renewable energy opportunities.

Broadcast date: 2/16/2017

How can California fight climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and still meet its energy needs?

Join host Fred Munroe as he speaks with guests about how to plan for a low emissions future for California. He will be joined by Dr. Ray Weymann, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, who since retiring from his career in astrophysics has used his experience to give numerous lectures in climate science and is one of the founders of the Climate Science Rapid Response Team,  George Williams, past chairman of the Business Council for Sustainable Energy, and James Kelly, Chief Executive Officer for ARES North America as they discuss how California’s energy supply, infrastructure and energy usage will evolve, and what it might look like by 2050.

NASA

Last month, a group of 375 of the world’s top scientists signed onto a letter designed to draw attention to the risks of climate change. 

NASA

On Septemer 20, 2016, 375 members of the National Academy of Sciences signed an open letter designed to draw attention to the risks of climate change as we head into the November presidential election.

flickr King Tides Project - Claire Fackler

California is facing the highest sea levels ever measured according to new information from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 

Broadcast date: 4/23/2015

Climate change is real and it is happening now. There is clear scientific consensus and understanding of the cause and effect relationships. It has already begun to adversely affect the economy, health and global social stability, and humans are mainly responsible for it. The problem is serious, but experts believe it is solvable, not with expensive new technology, but with political will and by taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The longer we wait the more expensive and difficult it will be to solve.

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