climate change

In this edition of Issues & Ideas—protests, demonstrations and rallies continue across the Central Coast and nation, and one of the many issues brought into the spotlight is the racism that has shaped our cities over the past several decades, and how that racism intersects with climate change. We have an interview with Peter Rupert, director of the Economic Forecast Project at UC Santa Barbara, an initiative involved in Santa Barbara County's reopening after the pandemic shutdown. Consuelo Muets, CEO of SPOKES—which, for a membership fee, provides resources for nonprofits—talks with guests from OperaSLO and the Clark Center for the Performing Arts in Arroyo Grande. And finally, contributor Tom Wilmer traveled to Arkansas in 2016 and spoke with Robin White, superintendent of the National Park Service's Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site. Given the national conversation at the moment, we're listening again to White's perspective. 

Flickr/Anita Ritenour

A Central Coast professor is asking surfers to serve as citizen scientists on February 8 and 9, during the final king tide of this season.

King tides are an annual winter occurrence, when the combination of a full moon and Earth’s closer proximity to the sun cause tides that are both higher and lower than the normal tidal range.

Climate change, also known as global warming, is the most important issue of our time. A warming climate affects every person in this county and every person on this planet. It will impact all aspects of our lives: from the way we work and the way we play to the food we eat and even the places we live. It is in all of our best interests to do everything we can while we still have time.

Carbon neutral by 2035 is the most ambitious greenhouse gas emissions reduction target in the nation, but it’s not just about emissions, it’s about health, equity, economy, community well-being, and sharing our lessons with the state, the nation, and the world.

Earth Day is a global event each year, beginning on April 22, 1970, when millions of people took to the streets to protest the negative impacts of 150 years of industrial development. Today more than 1 billion people in 192 countries take part in what is the largest civic-focused day of action in the world. It is a day of political action and civic participation celebrated by individuals, children, families, business, community leaders, governments and many others.

Flickr user Duanephoto99

What will California's climate feel like in 60 years? For many urban areas, possibly just like much warmer and drier areas of Mexico. That’s according to a new interactive map based on global climate data released this week, which features several Central Coast cities.

Flickr/Ben Klocek

More than 100 local elected officials across California sent a letter to Governor Jerry Brown this week calling for a statewide plan “to phase out oil and gas drilling.” The letter included names of some recognizable Central Coast public figures.

Broadcast date: 3/8/2018

SunWork Renewable Energy Projects is a small 501(c)(3) nonprofit with a mission to help make solar more affordable and widespread with the help of trained volunteers. SunWork pushes to change the shape of our energy landscape, they do this by providing opportunities to individuals to make a meaningful impact on the environmental problems we face as a community. SunWork’s philosophy is to empower people to tackle renewable energy opportunities.

Broadcast date: 2/16/2017

How can California fight climate change, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and still meet its energy needs?

Join host Fred Munroe as he speaks with guests about how to plan for a low emissions future for California. He will be joined by Dr. Ray Weymann, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, who since retiring from his career in astrophysics has used his experience to give numerous lectures in climate science and is one of the founders of the Climate Science Rapid Response Team,  George Williams, past chairman of the Business Council for Sustainable Energy, and James Kelly, Chief Executive Officer for ARES North America as they discuss how California’s energy supply, infrastructure and energy usage will evolve, and what it might look like by 2050.

NASA

Last month, a group of 375 of the world’s top scientists signed onto a letter designed to draw attention to the risks of climate change. 

NASA

On Septemer 20, 2016, 375 members of the National Academy of Sciences signed an open letter designed to draw attention to the risks of climate change as we head into the November presidential election.

flickr King Tides Project - Claire Fackler

California is facing the highest sea levels ever measured according to new information from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 

Broadcast date: 4/23/2015

Climate change is real and it is happening now. There is clear scientific consensus and understanding of the cause and effect relationships. It has already begun to adversely affect the economy, health and global social stability, and humans are mainly responsible for it. The problem is serious, but experts believe it is solvable, not with expensive new technology, but with political will and by taking action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The longer we wait the more expensive and difficult it will be to solve.

Flickr member Enrique Dans

Warmer temperatures and the lingering drought in California could lead to increased levels of West Nile Virus, according to medical experts.

The California Department of Public Health said Wednesday that the state saw record virus activity in 2014.

Doctor Vicki Kramer runs the Vector-Borne Disease Program in the Department and said the Central Coast has been protected somewhat because of it's cooler temperatures. But, the drought and record warmth during the first few months of 2015 could make maters worse.

Marine Mammal Center

There is a major spike in the number of starving sea lion pups showing up on Central Coast beaches. While the influx is overwhelming facilities like the Marine Mammal Center in Morro Bay, all rescued animals are still being accepted according to spokesperson Laura Sherr.

The organization says it has rescued more than 500 animals so far this year, more than ever before in its 40 year history.

Broadcast date: 3/5/2015

There are more than three hundred miles of ocean along the Central Coast of California, between Santa Cruz and Carpinteria. 

Randol White - KCBX News

The Central Coast saw a very warm, dry January this year, as did the rest of the state. Now, Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) say it ranks among the warmest and driest on record.

Not only was this January the fourth warmest in the books, but it follows the warmest January ever in 2014. 

Live Stream: Climate Change Impacts on Critical Infrastructure

State Senator Hannah-Beth held a public hearing in Santa Barbara earlier today to address Climate Change and Emergency management.

The hearing was designed to discuss the risks associated with climate change and what's left to be done. Panels of experts presented Climate Change reports and examined how climate change has already affected California.

Carbon Shock

Oct 3, 2014

Broadcast date: 09/29/14

Journalist Mark Shapiro investigates the economic disruption caused by climate change. At the heart of the challenges we face is how to establish a price for carbon.

Broadcast date: 9/11/2014

Climate change is threatening the health and well-being of our communities. Locally, increased temperatures are impacting our environment and the Central Coast is experiencing severe drought and reduced air quality. These changes to our environment have the potential to greatly impact our health.

Weather Anomalies

Mar 7, 2014

Environment writer Paul Rogers and climate scientist for the National Resources Defense Council, Dan Lashof, examine the range of possibilities that are bringing about climate change.

Climate change is making English wine better

Feb 21, 2014

Britain has suffered its worst winter rainfall since records began – 250 years ago, and scientists say climate change is to blame. But the effects are not all bad. The UK is seeing much warmer summers, and that’s reversed the fortunes of a once derided industry: English winemaking. Once it was widely dismissed as "undrinkable."

Marisa Waddell talks with local climate change activist Heidi Harmon about what individuals and communities can do to mitigate the negative outcomes of climate change.