Earth Day

Scientists around the world agree that pollution, habitat destruction, and over-exploitation of natural resources have created a climate emergency that threatens great harm to human health, wellbeing, and livelihoods. Here at home in California and on the Central Coast, we are experiencing those effects first hand. The U.S. drought monitor reports approximately more than half of California is already experiencing a severe drought, and that we are primed for a severe 2021 fire season. And while climate change is a threat to everyone’s health and well-being, some groups—socially and economically disadvantaged ones—face the greatest risks. So, what can we do?

Join us as we continue our celebration of Earth Month! Join Fred Munroe as he speaks with an array of Central Coast organizations working on ways to protect and restore the environment, combat the climate crisis, and pursue environmental justice for communities that are most vulnerable. Fred will talk with Mary Ciesinski with EcoSLO, Lexi Bell with The Morro Bay National Estuary Program, Eric Veium with The San Luis Obispo Climate Coalition, and Lucas Zucker and Rebeca Garcia with Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE) about the important work they are doing around these issues and how you can help create a better future and save the earth. 

The theme for Earth Day 2021 is Restore Our Earth, which focuses on natural processes, emerging green technologies, and innovative thinking that can restore the world’s ecosystems. Understanding the ocean’s role in climate change and how we approach business and conservation associated with the oceans are a critical part of the solution to the climate crisis.

Join us in a celebration of Earth Day, as host Kris Kington-Barker speaks with Benjamin Ruttenberg, Associate Professor in the Biological Sciences Department at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo and director of the Center for Coastal Marine Sciences. They will discuss the threat that climate change poses to our oceans, marine life, and coastal communities, as well as talk about how a move toward a blue economy can help.

ECOSLO.org

A gray wolf made a brief appearance in Monterey County last week, and experts say spreading awareness about this protected wolf is essential in minimizing wolf-livestock conflicts. A new audio production called "Voices of the Earth" presents thoughts about the environment from across the ages. EcoSLO continues to advocate for the environment after 50 years on the Central Coast. We hear from Cal Poly president Jeffrey Armstrong about covid testing on campus, and visions for the future.

 

  Voices of the Earth deals with the troubled relationship between humans and the natural world. Compiled by Charles Junkerman and Rush Rehm Voices of the Earth brings together some of the greatest environmental voices from across the centuries to celebrate the anniversary of Earth Day. With a cast of 90 different characters – poets, naturalists, scientists, politicos, deniers, and heroes, Voices of the Earth presents a kaleidoscope of views on the earth we inhabit, and the existential crisis we face.

Join host Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with Rush Rehm, Professor, Theater and Performance Studies, and Classics, Stanford University and Artistic Director, Stanford Repertory Theater (SRT), and Magnus Toren, Executive Director of the Henry Miller Memorial Library in Big Sur about this inspiring work and its call to action.

Frank Chen / Stanford Repertory Theater

On April 22, 2021, Earth Day will celebrate its 51st year, but environmental pioneers and poets have been writing about the need to care for our planet much longer. A new audio production called "Voices of the Earth" presents thoughts about the environment from across the ages.

On this week's Issues & Ideas, we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, by speaking to its organizer, Denis Hayes, in a wide-ranging and in-depth conversation. Correspondent Tom Wilmer takes us to Camp San Luis Obispo to find out what the National Guard are doing there. To see how virtual learning is faring during pandemic school closures, we check in with school districts in Monterey and San Luis Obispo counties. We also learn how Santa Barbara teenagers are helping seniors during the pandemic through a program called 'Zoomers to Boomers.' All that and more on this episode of Issues & Ideas.

Issues & Ideas: Denis Hayes and Earth Day

Apr 21, 2020

This week marks the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day. A half-century ago, environmental degradation in the United States had reached such an alarming point to so many people that a day was set aside to focus on protecting the planet. In 1990, the April 22 celebration went global and events were organized in countries around the world. The man behind both the creation and expansion of the annual Earth Day is Denis Hayes. KCBX's Greta Mart spoke via Zoom with Hayes, from his office in Seattle in what's considered the world's greenest building. 

Earth Day is a global event each year, beginning on April 22, 1970, when millions of people took to the streets to protest the negative impacts of 150 years of industrial development. Today more than 1 billion people in 192 countries take part in what is the largest civic-focused day of action in the world. It is a day of political action and civic participation celebrated by individuals, children, families, business, community leaders, governments and many others.

Broadcast date: 4/29/2018 

This past weekend around the world individual’s and cities celebrated Earth Day, which is marked on April 22 every year. This year's Earth Day was focused on ending plastic pollution in the oceans, the land and in our bodies. 300 million tons of plastic are sold each year and that 90% of that is thrown away.  A huge percentage of those plastics end up in our landfills, our oceans, our wildlife and our bodies.  It’s with that concern, that organizations and people around the world are calling on government leaders to take the health risks of plastic seriously and asking them to ban single use plastics and non-recyclable products.

48 years ago, on April 22, 1970, millions of people took to the streets to protest the negative impacts of 150 years of industrial development - and the first Earth Day was born. With global ecological awareness growing, the US Congress responded quickly to create the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and pass environmental laws such as the Clean Water Act and the Endangered Species Act. But here we are, facing catastrophic change and instead of strengthening protections, the United States is moving backwards.

Earth day. The one day each year when we honor our home and habitat. Should it be a time of celebration or mourning? As humans we have a poor track record of caring for our environment- just as we struggle to care for each other and ourselves. Tune in for a conversation about where we go from here.

April is 'Down to Earth' wine month in California

Apr 2, 2014
Wine Institute

Eco-friendly wines and winery events are featured this month as part of the Wine Institute's third-annual Down to Earth celebrations in California.

The month is aimed at bringing attention to the state's leadership in sustainable winegrowing and winemaking.

"Our California Sustainable Winegrowing Program leads the world in comprehensiveness and size with wineries and vineyards that produce nearly three-quarters of California’s wine grapes and wine participating,” said Bobby Koch, President and CEO of Wine Institute.