Food Systems

Mark C. Anderson

Why aren’t there more people of color and women at agriculture conferences? One organization is actively working to change the demographics of both presenters and attendees—and workshop topics—at what's considered the oldest and largest organic farming conference in the West.

Broadcast date: 7/28/16

In the U.S., the average fruit or vegetable can travel as much as 1,500 miles from where it was grown to your dinner plate. Eating more locally grown foods can have many benefits for not only the consumer, but also small farmers and the community. Locally grown food can help build a thriving local economy, promotes health in the community, and even benefits the soil, which can assist in ensuring a quality food system for generations to come.

Join host Fred Munroe as he speaks with Jeff Wade, with Slow Money SLO, Bob Roos, President with the North County Farmer's Market Association, and Eric Michielssen, President of the Board for the SLO Natural Foods Co-op, as they discuss the economic and agricultural importance of creating food hubs for linking small farmers to consumers, as well as other ways to increase access and promote affordability of local foods in the community. 

Central Coast Voices is sponsored by ACTION for Healthy Communities in collaboration with KCBX and made possible through underwriting by Joan Gellert-Sargen.

Broadcast date: 10/16/2014

Supporters of building local, sustainable and fair food systems believe that by connecting members of our community to the abundance of local food and farming in the County they can bridge the gap between what people eat and where it comes from, and in doing so, can  strengthen the food culture and the relationship people have with their food. These efforts have the potential to foster strong connections among farmers and have the ability to not only nourish our community, but make local food products more accessible for everyone.