Health Care

Issues & Ideas: NAACP, Latinx healthcare and Miss Odette

Jul 17, 2020

The San Luis Obispo County chapter of the NAACP has big plans for the next five years; we share a conversation with the chapter’s leaders. KCBX's Greta Mart speaks to a researcher who is studying ways in which community groups can help immigrants within the Latinx community get access to better health care. The authors of a new book on stress management techniques for first-responders share some practical tips. We’ll learn about a remote mountain top in rural California where a years-long renaming effort continues, and we’ll visit a rare underwater lab run by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute— one of the world's only long-term monitoring sites at that depth. Finally, San Luis Obispo County's Miss Oddette serves up pulled pork and a conversation about racial justice.

Navigating the complexity of modern health care can be overwhelming for anyone. But it's especially challenging for those who are aging and their family members who want to be supportive but don't know how to help. Tune in  Conversation with The Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett and her guest, elder advocate Linda Beck, about creating a plan and understanding options when it comes to dealing with the medical world. 

California governor to propose that state manufactures its own generic drugs

Jan 9, 2020
CalMatters

In a bold strategy to drive down prescription drug prices, Gov. Gavin Newsom is proposing that California become the first state in the nation to establish its own generic drug label, making those medications available at an affordable price to the state’s 40 million residents.

Broadcast date: 5/18/2017

A survey, by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) shows that about 8% of Americans don’t take their medicines as prescribed by a doctor because they can’t afford them. According to the 2016 SLO County Commission on Aging report, an estimated 38 percent—or more than 13,000—of SLO County seniors older than 65 didn’t have enough income to meet their basic needs, this includes health care and prescription medications. Even with Medicaid, nearly 10% of older adults were unable to pay for their prescriptions, because of a coverage gap, known as the "donut hole" and those without insurance or living below the federal poverty level faired even worse— nearly 14% did not take medications as prescribed.

Broadcast date: 5/19/16

While the Affordable Care Act has made coverage more available and affordable for many Americans through subsidized insurance and an expansion of Medi-Caid in states which have opted to do so, several million Californians still don’t have health insurance.