mental health

For members of BIPOC communities, developing healthy relationships with their bodies and wellness in general can be challenging because the habits modeled by the dominant culture as "normal" do not reflect or address the diets, self care and self expression found in these diverse populations and can often lead to great harm. Tune in for a Conversation with The Reluctant Therapist's guest hosts, David Gudiel and Aaliyah Sade, as they explore their own personal journeys to reclaim their bodies and wellness outside of a patriarchal narrative that ignores and often rejects the wisdom of ancestors and ancient knowledge. We continue to open this space during BIPOC Mental Health Awareness month to give access to those voices who are rarely heard and need to be amplified.

With the number of married people in the U.S. at an all-time low, co-habitations at an all-time high and a generational rejection of traditional relationships, many wonder if we've seen the end of matrimony as a form of creating intimate connections. Tune in for a conversation with guest hosts David Gudiel and Aaliyah Sade about their recent engagement. They share their vision for their future as partners and the act of courage it takes to commit to a lifelong partnership in the 21st century.

How we identify, name and introduce ourselves can be an action of empowerment and inclusion—or, if we are not careful with our language, it can also be a source a disconnection and 'otherness.' Meeting each other where we are and as who we are is an important bridge to understanding and care. Tune in for a conversation with The Reluctant Therapist and guest hosts Aaliyah Sade and David Gudiel about the many ways that the helping professions fail to recognize or address the impact of institutional and systemic issues on the mental health and well-being of BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) communities. This is the kick-off for BIPOC mental health awareness month and the beginning of a series of discussions and topics chosen and lead by this heart-centered, activist, artistic, passionate couple of recent Gen Z college graduates.

It may be a revolutionary idea to re-allocate funding away from police departments and toward programs and helping professionals trained to meet the social needs of the community - but how can we be sure that the care being dispersed will actually support, heal and benefit the citizens communities seek to serve? Tune in  for a conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, and guests about the limitations of one-size fits all interventions and the challenges in relying on institutions to provide for our collective mental health and well-being.

When everything hits at once it can feel like you are drowning—the weight of the world bears down on your chest and even the simplest of daily tasks can began to feel like rolling a boulder up a hill. If that sounds familiar, you're not alone. Since March there has been a 30% increase in reported depressive episodes in people who have not struggled with mental health before. With limited services available, where can people get help? Tune in for a conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, about coping with stress overload, recognizing deep melancholy and building resilience while trying to care for children, family, friends and hoping to heal the world.

In the spirit of 'Live Oak on the Radio,' tune in to revisit a raw and honest 2019 backstage conversation with Reluctant Therapist Elizabeth Barrett and singer, songwriter, artist and survivor Sunny War, setting the mood for this upcoming weekend of music, memories and camping at home to support Central Coast Public Radio KCBX. Tune in started Friday for more than 30 hours of music from the festival’s archive recordings of past stage performances, along with live concerts from local musicians and special appearances by other Live Oak personalities, such as MC Joe Craven.

What's next, graduates? Shaping the future. With a world of uncertainty facing them, what is the graduating class of 2020 thinking about their future? Tune in for a Conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, and students David Guidel, Mariah Kate Alviso-Saenz, Bailey Buchanan and Kristine Sandoval about their hopes, dreams, concerns and ambitions. If we have any hope for real change, it is going to be fueled by this next generation of highly educated, incredibly compassionate, focused, fierce and thoughtful activists.

The Reluctant Therapist: How will you show up?

Jun 2, 2020

It may be hard to know how to respond to all of the anger, outrage, confusion, chaos and pain that is being expressed all over the country at this time. But without a clear path or guide in how to navigate the upheaval, the protests, the riots and deeply systemic and institutionalized inequity, maybe all we can do is show up. Tune in for a conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, and artist, activist Raul Pacheco of the band Ozomatli.

To have and to hold, for better for worse, for richer for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death do us part; how hard can that be? Tune in for a conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, and guests Larella Ellsworth and Trish Wilson about the state of their unions and the world of marriage in general. Maybe marital bliss is the wrong goal?

Central Coast singer-songwriter Chris Beland is a musically-gifted and gentle soul.  He also has a wildly interesting and almost unbelievable life story.  Hear a remarkable conversation about life lessons and living without regrets, in this episode of The Reluctant Therapist.

Buddhist teacher Pema Chodron once said, "Compassion is not a relationship between the healer and the wounded. It's a relationship between equals. Only when we know our own darkness well can we be present with the darkness of others. Compassion becomes real when we recognize our shared humanity." 

Tune in to the Reluctant Therapist for a compelling conversation with Compassion Prison Project founder Fritzi Horstman, talking about her life, her work and her vision and belief that bringing humanity and compassion to those behind bars will change society in fundamental ways. 

With the national shutdown, many aspects of our lives have been drastically disrupted.  But for those  looking forward to a special event like a wedding, graduation or new job, the loss of the celebration associated with this life event can be devastating.  Tune into this conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, about dealing with—and helping others to navigate—the disappointment and even grief associated with not being able to experience and mark these major milestones. 

Join Elizabeth Barrett and her guest Ashlyn Hatch as they discuss ways to reduce stress. Many of us are dealing with isolation, sickness, a house full of family and the loss of jobs due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Barrett and Hatch share their own experiences along with tips and advice.

Shelter-in-place parenting has become a category of its own, an unprecedented experience that has even the most confident of caregivers struggling to meet the daily demands of their children. Elizabeth Barrett and her guest, therapist Megan Englert, discuss strategies for keeping it all together when we're not sure where we're going.

The outbreak of the COVID-19 virus is stressful to the community in numerous ways. Individuals may have fear and anxiety about catching the virus for either themselves or their loved ones. People may be experiencing loneliness from isolation due to the stay-at-home orders. And many individuals may have increased worry due to the economic repercussions of the pandemic. How will their business survive? How will they pay their mortgage or rent? How can they get food for their family? The coronavirus can significantly affect mental health for everyone, but especially for those who already suffer from mental illness. How are these individuals able to continue treatment?

 

Have you ever wondered how people persevere despite roadblocks and obstacles? The Resiliency Project seeks to learn how people experience setbacks, opposition, and oppression while retaining (or ultimately regaining) mental and physical well-being.

Courtesy Mental Health Services Oversight & Accountability Commission

Trying to improve mental health services for California students, a group of young people from around the state recently met up in Santa Barbara to come up with new ideas. And it included students and mental health advocates from across the Central Coast.

If it is in our nature as humans to err, then why is it so difficult to forgive? It may be because we are conditioned to focus on our negatives. In an effort to make space for giving thanks, it might be time to let go of stale shame, guilt and anger. Listen to this conversation with Elizabeth Barrett, the Reluctant Therapist, about recognizing the good in ourselves and others and learning to be okay with gratitude.

Tara Niendam, Toby Ewing, "Statewide Learning Health Care Network and Evaluation of California's Early Psychosis Programs."

Last December, Brighid FitzGibbon’s son, Evan, entered a catatonic state. Acute psychosis had hit suddenly a few weeks earlier, toward the end of fall semester of his sophomore year at Bard College in upstate New York. Gripped by terrifying delusions, his body began to shut down.

Bishop Street Studios is a unique project that takes a step towards solving the much larger community and state-wide housing crisis by focusing on providing supportive housing and services to people with mental illness in San Luis Obispo.

Greta Mart/KCBX News

One-third of San Luis Obispo County jail inmates have mental illness, and half the jail population is either homeless or doesn’t have stable housing on the outside. That's according to county health experts, who said the numbers have held steady even as they work to improve jail healthcare. The county board of supervisors got an update on jail health care this week and discussed ways to keep some of the area’s most vulnerable from ending up behind bars. But not all county jurisdictions are embracing preventative methods.

Jeffrey Jurgens stood in a cage in an orange jumpsuit, screaming that he was Jesus Christ. From her seat in the Sacramento courtroom, his mother watched through tears.

Joanna Jurgens knew how important it was for the district attorney prosecuting Jeffrey for stealing a car—and the judge deciding his fate—to see the extent of her son’s illness. But it was torture to watch.

Broadcast date: 1/31/19

Mental health affects everyone in some manner, however, individuals often hesitate to reach out for support. Early experiences and messages surrounding mental health can frame someone’s understanding of their mental health as well as others’ mental health. This can affect both their likeliness to seek help and feel hopeful about recovery, but also how they perceive mental illness in our community. Less than one-third of adults with a mental health issue will get help. Data shows that fear of others’ perceptions, as well as fear of discrimination are the main reasons people don’t access mental health services. With community education we can remove the stigma, and people with mental illness will more readily seek treatment. Recovery is possible--Up to 90 percent of those who get help are able to significantly reduce symptoms and improve their quality of life.

What are you voting for? Is it for the betterment of yourself or the well-being of the greater good? If voting is a right of citizenship, what are our responsibilities as citizens? Listen in for a conversation with the Reluctant Therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, about what brings us to the polls.

Greta Mart/KCBX

The San Luis Obispo County jail has been under scrutiny for several years over inmate deaths inside the facility. The issue came to a head in 2017 after the death of Andrew Holland, a mentally ill inmate who had been tied to a restraint chair for almost two days. About 10 days ago another inmate inside the jail committed suicide.

Join host Brian Reynolds in a conversation with Jill Bolster-White, Executive Director of the Transitions/Mental Health Association. Listen to a discussion concerning mental health issues, including insurance coverage, how mental illnesses are different from disabilities, and the stigma still attached to mental health issues despite historical gains in the mental health arena.

Jessica Paterson

The Mental Health Services Act has long supplied the bulk of funding for California counties to prevent and treat mental illness among Medi-Cal patients. But some counties aren’t using the money. San Luis Obispo County had a $14.7 million fund balance at the end of the 2015-2016 fiscal year. 

Governor's budget earmarks funding for mental, inmate and rural health issues

May 14, 2018
Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Governor Jerry Brown has proposed some one-time budget allotments that could improve health services for inmates, the mentally ill and rural residents going forward; all currently key issues in San Luis Obispo County.

What is the state of San Luis Obispo?

Mar 22, 2018
The City of San Luis Obispo

What’s the state of San Luis Obispo? That’s what city leaders sought to convey this week.

San Luis Obispo's mayor and city manager held the inaugural State of the City address at City Hall Wednesday night for members of the community willing to brave the rain. And while city officials touted many accomplishments, they said there are still plenty of challenges ahead.

Turn Worry to Trust. In an age when we are more connected than ever, why is it that we still feel so insecure, vulnerable and afraid? It might be that we've give into worry and lost our ability to trust. Tune in Tuesday at 2 for a conversation with the reluctant therapist, Elizabeth Barrett, about serendipity, kismet and an actual godsend. Your calls will be welcomed and encouraged.

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