#metoo

#metoo, #whyIdidntireport, #domesticviolenceawarenessmonth - with all of the allegations and revelations about sexual abuse and assault that have flooded the news, our communities and our personal lives over the last year - will it ever be possible to find peace again? How do we provide solace and support for those who have been forever affected and also find a way to move forward as a country?

Broadcast date: 7/5/2018

More than six months after the #MeToo movement began, its effects continue to be widely felt across the nation. Hardly a week goes by when another media story isn’t published. The movement which began by exposing the abuses of powerful men in the media industry, has now spread to numerous other industries and occupations, including a variety of well-known corporations and educational institutions.

In 1848, 300 women and men gathered in Seneca Falls, NY for the inaugural Women's Rights Convention, advertised as a convention to discuss social, civil and religious conditions and the rights of women. Tune in Tuesday at 2 pm for a conversation with the reluctant therapist Elizabeth Barrett  from the Women's Rights National Historic Park in western New York, about the role of history in making the women's marches and #metoo movements possible today.

With so many causes needing our attention, how do we narrow our focus in a way that can really make a difference and prevent the inevitable burnout and overwhelming feelings that often accompany activism? Elizabeth Barrett leads a conversation about one of the keys to sustaining our mental health: service to others. How do we each create our own authentic way of taking action?

Women in California politics describe culture of harassment

Oct 17, 2017
Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

From Capital Public Radio: An outcry against pervasive sexual harassment and assault that has gone viral on social media under the hashtag #metoo has also reached the California state Capitol.