National Park Superintendent Robin White

National Park Service/ Tom Wilmer

Join correspondent Tom Wilmer in Little Rock, Arkansas for an interview with Robin White, National Park Service Superintendant at Central High School National Historic Site, and Courtney Bradford, professor of black history and curator at Mosaic Templars Cultural Center.

National Park Service

  When correspondent Tom Wilmer stopped in to visit with Robin White, National Park Service Superintendent at Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site, their conversation quickly led to tears when Wilmer asked White to talk about lessons learned, but more importantly, lessons not learned in the intervening six decades--a moment in time back in September 4, 1957, when nine African American students attempted to register for classes at the all-white Central High School.

Elizabeth Eckford runs a gauntlet of hate to attend high school in Little Rock. The young white woman just over her shoulder with her mouth open, yelling at her is Hazel Bryan-- Arkansas September 1957
Will Counts

September 4th, 1957 was the first day of school in Little Rock Arkansas. Nine black children attempted to start classes at the all white Central High school. Their entry was blocked by hundreds of Arkansas national Guardsmen who had been sent on direct orders issued by Arkansas Governor Orville Faubus to block the entry of the nine black students who will forever live on in history as the Little Rock Nine.