race

For weeks following the death of George Floyd and during the protests that have followed, activists across the country have called on community leaders to “defund the police.” But what does this really mean? And is this the solution that we need? Why do we as a community need to rethink public safety?

In a statement issued in the wake of the murder of George Floyd by Minneapolis police, NAACP's president said, “What we must do now is protest peacefully, demand persistently and fight politically.” Join host Fred Munroe as he speaks with Cheryl Vines, local business owner of Mesa Design Group and co-founder, secretary and chair of WIN, and Stephen Vines, president of NAACP San Luis Obispo County and an area director for Central California. They will discuss the events surrounding George Floyd’s death, and issues of race, racism and police violence, and talk about suggestions for action.

 

Santa Barbara County’s COVID-19 cases now total 1,376, including 895 cases from the  correctional complex in Lompoc, a federal prison. The northern part of the county continues to be the hardest hit by the virus, with 190 cases in the city of Santa Maria, compared to just 69 case within the city of Santa Barbara. As we have also seen nationally, the virus has had a disproportionate impact on the county’s racial and ethnic minorities. According to a recent presentation by the Santa Barbara Public Health Department, Hispanics make up less than half of the county’s population, but account for over 60% of the confirmed COVID-19 cases. What is the county doing to control the spread of the virus? Are their efforts to flatten the curve working? What is being done to assist the Latino community to prevent virus spread, access health care and care for basic needs?

In commemoration of Black History Month, R.A.C.E. Matters SLO has launched a month-long, multimedia, multi-location event series entitled BELONGING, meant to give a voice to members of the San Luis Obispo County community who are of African American descent.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, San Luis Obispo County is over 71% white—considerably higher than the statewide percentage of just over 40%. How does this reality shape local conversations about racism and structural inequality?

Join host Fred Munroe as he speaks with guests with guests Cameron Clay; Donna Helete, a regenerative grief coach; and Dr. Leola Dublin Macmillan, critical cultural scholar, essayist, and consultant about their upcoming workshop, “Preparing to Put in the Work: Intersectionality in Action.” The workshop is presented by San Luis Obispo-based group R.A.C.E. Matters and begins the conversation on how to leverage white privilege in pursuit of a more just and equitable community.

Broadcast date: 2/2/17

Founded on February 12, 1909, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) is the nation’s oldest, largest and most widely recognized grassroots-based civil rights organization. Its more than half-million members and supporters throughout the United States and the world are the premier advocates for civil rights in their communities, campaigning for equal opportunity and conducting voter mobilization.

Broadcast date: 12/1/16

In the homogenous communities of the Central Coast, it can be awkward and uncomfortable to confront matters of racial justice, but given the dramatic killings of unarmed African Americans in other areas of the country, it becomes difficult to turn a blind eye to our country's institutional racism. R.A.C.E. Matters SLO County, and other like-minded individuals, have begun to advance a local dialogue around race to provide space for marginalized groups to be heard.

Reflection

Dec 19, 2014

Broadcast date: 12/15/2014

Environmental Lawyer, presidential advisor and author Gus Speth talks about his latest book, Angels by the River. He reflects on race, environment, politics and living on the front lines of change.

It was a three person race for San Luis Obispo County's District 4 Supervisor's seat, currently held by Governor Brown appointee Caren Ray.

Ray gathered 42.6 percent of the vote on Tuesday, putting her in second place.

Challenger Lynn Compton topped the vote totals with 46.43 percent.

Compton and Ray will now face off in November, because nobody got more than 50 percent.

Mike Byrd came in a distant third with 10.8 percent of the vote.

Twitter feed @dandow

One of the more hotly contested races on the Central Coast this spring was the one for San Luis Obispo County District Attorney.

Overnight numbers show Deputy District Attorney Dan Dow the winner with more than 53 percent of the vote to Assistant District Attorney Tim Covello's nearly 45 percent.

Twitter feed @AmgenTourofCali

Riders in the Amgen Tour of California, the largest professional bicycle race in the United States, encountered temperatures well above normal for the Central Coast during Wednesday's Stage 4 along Highway 1.

Heat records were broken throughout San Luis Obispo County on Wednesday, with many inland locations hovering at or near 100 degrees. Along the coast, where the riders spent most of their time, temperatures were a bit more moderate with 80s and 90s.

An attorney from Pismo Beach is entering the race for San Luis Obispo County District Attorney—as a write-in candidate.

On Thursday, Paul Phillips submitted the final signatures he needed to qualify as an official write-in candidate, according to County Clerk Julie Rodewald.

Up until now, the contentious race for SLO County DA has been just between just the two candidates who will appear on June's ballot, Assistant District Attorney Tim Covello, and Dan Dow, the Deputy District Attorney.