rain

Mudslide threat closes Cal Poly dorm

Feb 24, 2017
Dylan Ring/KCBX

 

A Cal Poly dorm is closed for the next several months due to a recent mudslide behind the building. 275 student residents of Fremont Hall are moving out this week after recent storms put the dorm and residents in jeopardy. 

Greta Mart

Stormy weather continues to affect the Central Coast, with minor flooding in areas of San Luis Obispo and Monterey counties. KCBX spoke with PG&E meteorologist John Lindsey late Wednesday afternoon to find out more about what's in store. 

KCBX News, Randol White

UPDATE: October 31, 2016

October was a very wet month for the Central Coast, bringing widespread above-average rainfall totals to Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties.

Courtney Winters, City of Pismo Beach

What a difference a year makes.

In 2014, record-breaking heat hit the Amgen Tour of California participants during their stops in San Luis Obispo County.

The mercury soared above 100 degrees in many locations during Stage 4. Records show there were 90s along the coast as the riders sailed into Cambria.

The next morning, as they left the Pismo Beach Pier, temperatures were back up to the 90 degree mark again.

This year, riders are in for a much different scene, as the forecast calls for rain and well-below normal temperatures.

Santa Barbara Channelkeeper

It won't be in time for this weekend's storm, but a local group is helping people install rain barrels through a partnership with local wineries and breweries.

Santa Barbara Channelkeeper teamed up with Figueroa Mountain Brewery for an event this Sunday that's already fully booked.

An expert will explain how to install the barrels and conversion kits for your home's gutter system. 

Organizer Kira Redmond says just because all the barrels are already spoken for this time around, there's still room for more people to attend.

The most recent climate charts from the scientists at NOAA show we're likely to have a wetter-than-normal start to the New Year. This is the first time in five years a prediction like this has been called for California and the Central Coast.

Bob Benjamin is a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Monterey. He says the strong, stubborn ridge of high pressure that kept storms out of the picture for the past few years doesn't appear to have the same force this season.

Flickr member Damian Gadal

All of the wet weather the Central Coast is receiving this December has put an official end to fire season in the Los Padres National Forest, something that failed to happen last year.

Cal Fire says the high fire season is over for the first time since spring of 2013.

Unit Forester Alan Peters says the declaration gives fire crews time to engage in some training and other activities they can't do during peak season. While Central Coast hills have received enough moisture and greening to drop the fire level, Peters says the declaration could be short-lived.

Clean-up underway following giant West Coast storm

Dec 12, 2014
Cal Trans

Clean-up and utility crews were hard at work throughout the Central Coast Friday, in the wake of Thursday night's big storm. Strong winds and heavy rain caused massive power outages, flooding, and property destruction throughout the KCBX listening area.

As of Friday evening, PG&E reported roughly 6,500 customers still without power, down from a peak of 12,000 Thursday night.

National Weather Service

Tuesday and Wednesday could see the strongest storm to hit the Central Coast since a Pacific storm last March slammed into the area.

The bulk of the rainfall is expected to take place from Tuesday afternoon into the evening hours, with up to five inches of rain possible along the local foothills and mountains.

Maria Long is organizing warming shelters to bring people out of the wet and cold this week, through her organization, Freedom Warming Centers.

National Weather Service

The Central Coast is expected to see the strongest rain event of the season this Friday afternoon into Saturday morning as a fast moving cold front heads toward the area.

Bonnie Bartling is with the National Weather Service in Oxnard and says rain totals along the Central Coast will be more significant the farther north you go.

NOAA

A report released today by the National Climate Prediction Center shows the likelihood of an El Niño developing this fall or winter is dropping.

The most recent data also show diminishing odds of any potential El Niño being strong, which is often associated with extremely wet winters in California.

Thursday's report shows the probability of an El Niño developing at 65 percent, a drop of 15 points from a couple of months ago.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says El Nino conditions are forming in the ocean.

Michael Halpert, the Deputy Director of the Climate Prediction Center for NOAA, says ocean surface temperatures are above normal but are not yet warm enough to officially proclaim El Niño conditions. “Down below the surface of the ocean,” he explains, “we’ve seen large changes in that of above average temperatures. And often times when that happens it eventually does surface and that signals we have transitioned into El Niño.”

Rain headed to the Central Coast

Mar 24, 2014
National Weather Service

A weak spring storm is headed toward the Central Coast Tuesday night and it appears San Luis Obispo County is poised to see the most rainfall out of this one. The northern portion of Santa Barbara County could see some measurable precipitation too.

The National Weather Service predicts less than a half an inch of rain will accumulate through Wednesday night.

Clearing skies are likely on Thursday, but a stray shower is still possible.

Significant rainstorm predicted for Central Coast

Feb 21, 2014
KCBX News

Updated Monday, 2/24 at 1:52 p.m. PST:

The month of February could end much the way it started, with some badly-needed rainfall for California and the Central Coast. Unlike the last couple of rain events however, this time around the region could get hit with a major winter storm.