research

Jake Javier

In November, California voters will be deciding on a dozen statewide ballot measures. One is about funding stem cell research through bonds, Proposition 14.  

Courtesy of Cal Poly College of Engineering

In San Luis Obispo, some Cal Poly professors are using the spring quarter’s curriculum to provide tangible support to doctors and nurses during the pandemic, research the virus, and more—an impromptu study in real-world applications.

Cal Poly, Dennis Steers

Cal Poly recently received a five-year, $2.6 million grant for its regenerative medicine program from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM).

Centers for Disease Control (CDC)

Scientists at UCSB will soon begin studying how people around the world have responded to the Ebola threat, psychologically. The University's Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences is getting more $128,202 from the National Science Foundation for the project.

Professor David Sherman is working with lead researcher Dr. Heejung Kim on the project and says the goal is to help us understand how and why we respond the way we do.

Clara Knapp, KCBX News

When you first step on to the Cal Poly Research Pier in Avila Beach, you can barely see the university's facility a half-mile away.

“It is unique, I don’t think that there’s another structure like it along the entire west coast of the United States," said Dean Wendt, Director of the Cal Poly Center for Coastal Marine Sciences. "Things that people need to do on a ship sometimes can be done right from the end of our pier, last year about 1200 students took coursework out at the pier.”

The next time you make an angry face, you may be comforted to know that the elements of that face are built into our genetic makeup.

Researchers at UC Santa Barbara in collaboration with Australia's Griffith University have identified the functional advantages behind the face. The findings are in the current edition of the journal Evolution and Human Behavior.

The scientists say every aspect of the angry face—from your mouth up to your eyebrows—is aimed at intimidating your subject. The look has evolved to make you look stronger.