steam

Thomas Wilmer

Principal Dr. Ryan Jackson shares with correspondent Tom Wilmer how Tennessee’s Mt Pleasant Arts Innovation Zone preK-12 educational model benefits student’s educational goals by infusing Art into S.T.E.M.

Learning comes alive, as students passionately work on curricular projects ranging from creating NASA-mentored self-sustaining habitats on Mars, to building/selling tiny houses that can result in various trade certifications at completion.

Gone is the “sit and listen” drudgery, replaced by the vibrancy of “think and do”, resulting in kids’ genuine ownership of their educational journeys. 

Click here to listen to Dr. Ryan's TEDX talk

The Dr. Jackson STEAM education show is the 12th in a multi-part series showcasing Nashville’s Big Back Yard--an economic and tourism initiative that encompasses the Natchez Trace National Parkway in Tennessee’s southwest quarter down to the Shoals Region in Northern Alabama.

On this episdoe of Issues & Ideas: We learn more about a STEAM—science, technology, engineering, the arts and math—program for middle school students offered by the Foundation at Hearst Castle. And a nationwide shortage prompts distilleries in San Luis Obispo County to turn production over to hand sanitizer. We hear more about a nonprofit organization called 'School on Wheels' that tutors homeless children in Santa Barbara County. And Father Ian takes us on an educational tour of Central Coast olive groves and olive oil producers. 

Thomas Wilmer

Michael Young, the Foundation at Hearst Castle's executive director, talks with correspondent Tom Wilmer about the foundation’s conservation and restoration programs, and what he considers the benefits of membership. Young also shares his passion for the Foundation’s middle school field trip experiences, aimed at inspiring students through Hearst Castle State Park STEAM experiences. 

Thomas Wilmer

Correspondent Tom Wilmer reports from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, exploring the university's Museum of Natural History with museum director Amy Harris, and the Museum of Art with its director, Christina Olsen. 

Tyler Pratt/KCBX News

Many have lamented the disappearance of the arts from public school curriculums. Over the past few decades, there’s been an emphasis on STEM—science, technology, engineering and math. But one local institution encourages turning STEM to STEAM by including the arts.