storm

Greta Mart/KCBX

A powerful storm brought heavy rains, gusty winds and pounding waves to the Central Coast Friday and early Saturday morning. Power outages across the region closed schools and businesses Friday morning in Monterey, San Luis Obispo and northern Santa Barbara counties, and as of Saturday morning, many customers remain without power. Weather forecasters say another storm system will arrive Monday, President's Day. Here's an update on Central Coast storm-related news:

KCBX News, Randol White

UPDATE: October 31, 2016

October was a very wet month for the Central Coast, bringing widespread above-average rainfall totals to Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties.

Paso Robles Police Department

The City of Paso Robles is working to clear out the homeless population from the Salinas Riverbed prior to this weekend's predicted heavy rains. 

Ricky Staub - Instagram @NeighborhoodFilm

A High Surf Warning issued Friday by the National Weather Service was in effect along the Central Coast through Saturday morning, and a High Surf Advisory extended through Sunday afternoon for areas south of Point Conception. 

National Weather Service

Rain showers are expected to hit the Central Coast Friday and continue through the weekend. Totals will vary greatly throughout the area with most of the rain falling to the north, possibly up to three inches.

Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties can expect steady rain over the next few days said Joe Sirard, Meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Oxnard. He said that urban runoff and minor flooding will be possible, mainly on Saturday. 

Clean-up underway following giant West Coast storm

Dec 12, 2014
Cal Trans

Clean-up and utility crews were hard at work throughout the Central Coast Friday, in the wake of Thursday night's big storm. Strong winds and heavy rain caused massive power outages, flooding, and property destruction throughout the KCBX listening area.

As of Friday evening, PG&E reported roughly 6,500 customers still without power, down from a peak of 12,000 Thursday night.

Credit CHP San Francisco Twitter: @CHPSanFrancisco

A series of Pacific storms—some of them rather strong—are showing promising signs of a wet rainy season for the Central Coast and California.

Meteorologists have made it abundantly clear following each passing storm that the rainfall received was not enough to end the drought.

It's hard for people to comprehend when they see images of flooding throughout the state.

So how much will it take, and where do we sit currently?

Brad Rippey is a Meteorologist with the USDA and tracks California’s water needs through the National Drought Mitigation Center. 

Amy Joseph - centralcoastpictures.com

In addition to the strong winds and significant rain expected Thursday and Friday, the Central Coast is likely to get hit was some very heavy surf.

The National Weather Service says western-facing beaches are most at risk from a major swell arriving late Thursday night and continuing through Saturday. Forecasters expect serious beach erosion because of the duration of the event.

Waves as high as 25 feet could be possible in some areas, and it's predicted that jetties and sea walls could be breached during periods of high tide.

National Weather Service

Tuesday and Wednesday could see the strongest storm to hit the Central Coast since a Pacific storm last March slammed into the area.

The bulk of the rainfall is expected to take place from Tuesday afternoon into the evening hours, with up to five inches of rain possible along the local foothills and mountains.

Maria Long is organizing warming shelters to bring people out of the wet and cold this week, through her organization, Freedom Warming Centers.

National Weather Service

The Central Coast is expected to see the strongest rain event of the season this Friday afternoon into Saturday morning as a fast moving cold front heads toward the area.

Bonnie Bartling is with the National Weather Service in Oxnard and says rain totals along the Central Coast will be more significant the farther north you go.

National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Marie became a Category 4 storm Sunday morning as it moved north, hundreds of miles off the West Coast of Mexico and farther out into open ocean.

The National Weather Service predicts potentially damaging surf generated by the storm to impact south and southeast facing beaches of Los Angeles and Ventura Counties, with surf building on Tuesday and peaking Tuesday night into Thursday.

There is potential for some of the highest surf seen in recent years for a southerly event, with max sets of 10 to 15 feet possible.

Rain headed to the Central Coast

Mar 24, 2014
National Weather Service

A weak spring storm is headed toward the Central Coast Tuesday night and it appears San Luis Obispo County is poised to see the most rainfall out of this one. The northern portion of Santa Barbara County could see some measurable precipitation too.

The National Weather Service predicts less than a half an inch of rain will accumulate through Wednesday night.

Clearing skies are likely on Thursday, but a stray shower is still possible.

SBC Fire Department Facebook

A pair of storm systems brought several inches of much-needed rain to the Central Coast over the past several days. The mid-winter punch provided some measurable relief to the region's exceptional drought status, yet much more is needed.

Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties saw the largest Central Coast rainfall totals, with some mountain areas receiving more than 14 inches of precipitation since Wednesday. Ojai topped the local cities with 6.21 inches recorded.

Significant rainstorm predicted for Central Coast

Feb 21, 2014
KCBX News

Updated Monday, 2/24 at 1:52 p.m. PST:

The month of February could end much the way it started, with some badly-needed rainfall for California and the Central Coast. Unlike the last couple of rain events however, this time around the region could get hit with a major winter storm.