Styrofoam

Wikimedia Commons

Products made out of polystyrene and expanded polystyrene (EPS)—commonly known as Styrofoam—will soon be prohibited in all of San Luis Obispo County. A years-long effort by many to pass a countywide ordinance aimed at stopping the use of polystyrene ended Wednesday. The ban will go into effect in six months.

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In mid-July, after several months of Santa Barbara city officials engaging with restaurants and businesses in an effort to reduce waste in the city, the Santa Barbara city council voted to pass local laws banning plastic straws, stirrers and cutlery and polystyrene—also known as Styrofoam—food containers

But at their July 24 meeting, council members voted to dial that back a bit. City of Santa Barbara Environmental Services Outreach Coordinator, Bryan Latchford, worked on both ordinances and spoke with KCBX’s Tyler Pratt to help explain what happened.

Wikimedia Commons/Horia Varlan

Santa Barbara officials decided this week to join other cities like San Luis Obispo in banning plastic straws and polystyrene. Most in attendance at Tuesday’s city council meeting were in support of the ban, but questions were raised about enacting one-size-fits-all rules for everyone.

Styrofoam ban fails in California Senate

Jan 30, 2018
Kai Hendry/Flickr

To-go cups and containers made of expanded polystyrene - otherwise known as Styrofoam - are already banned in all of Monterey County, and in many Central Coast cities such as Carpinteria, Arroyo Grande, Pismo Beach and Morro Bay. State lawmakers have tried several times to enact a statewide ban over the past decade, but this week the California Senate rejected a bill that would ban restaurants, food vendors and grocery stores from using Styrofoam containers. 

UPDATE: Pismo Beach polystyrene ban moves one step closer to becoming ordinance

Nov 17, 2015
Flickr member: Kai Hendry

UDPATE: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 at 5:21 p.m.

Pismo Beach is one step closer to banning expanded polystyrene—known by its brand name styrofoam—from being used by restaurants and other food purveyors. 

Nearly all SLO restaurants getting on board with polystyrene ban

Nov 2, 2015
Aidan Mathews

A ban on polystyrene—known by many as the brand name "Styrofoam"—is set to go into effect soon in the City of San Luis Obispo.

Flickr member playerx

San Luis Obispo city staff will move forward with plans on how to implement a Styrofoam use ban, should the council vote to approve one down the road.

A special one hour public meeting of the City Council was held Wednesday afternoon. Several members of the public spoke in favor of banning Styrofoam—or polystyrene—at the meeting.

City leaders described it as a "study session." Four out of the five city council members agreed to direct staff to continue working on the issue.

Councilman John Ashbaugh supports the strongest possible version of a ban.