travel

Travel has a profound effect on our mental, physical and intellectual lives - and often travel can be achieved by never leaving our homes. Taking a trip - in any form - by car, by foot, by plane or by brain - can help us to widen our perspectives and make room for personal growth in ways that felt impossible when stuck in our known routines and patterns. Tune in today at 2 for a conversation with Elizabeth Barrett, the reluctant therapist, about what inspires travel, and where we travel influences who we are.

Listen to part 2 of Ears on Art’s visit with Kate Froman, San Luis Obispo fiber artist. For four decades Froman has been creating art pieces using cotton, silk, and even garden clippings.

Thomas Wilmer

Join correspondent, Tom Wilmer in Detroit, Michigan for a visit with Dan Fuoco Interactive Marketing Manager for the Detroit Metro Convention & Visitors Bureau

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

 As the country is working on a plan to combat the Zika virus, a local blood provider is putting restrictions on who can donate.

Flickr member Mike Mozart

Gas prices in California are now 37 cents-per-gallon cheaper than this same time last year, according to fuel tracking company GasBuddy, and they're predicted to continue falling. 

Jay Thompson, Cal Poly

Cal Poly President Jeffrey Armstrong spent more than any other CSU president on travel expenses, according to a report by the Los Angeles News Group.

Flickr member Mark Doliner

Santa Barbara is the second most expensive city in the U.S. to spend your Memorial Day Weekend—or any summer vacation dates for that matter—according to a new survey by Los Angeles-based GoBankingRates.com. Only New York City ranks higher.

Content Director Casey Bond says the findings were not a shock.

"To be honest, I mean, most people don't know Santa Barbara for its low cost-of-living, so it wasn't too much of a surprise that it came out number two in our most expensive cities to travel to," said Bond.

San Francisco came in just behind Santa Barbara.

Tom Wilmer talks with award-winning travel journalist, Laurie McAndish King as she discusses her new book, Lost, Kidnapped, Eaten Alive and reads some selected passages.

Travel writer Tom Wilmer is a familiar voice here on Issues and Ideas. In fact, this month, Tom celebrates 25 years of bringing you travel-related audio-logs from throughout the Central Coast and around the world.

Just this past weekend, he was the recipient of the 2014 Lillian Dean Inspiration Award during the Central Coast Writers Conference at Cuesta College. Each year the conference selects a Central Coast author who has demonstrated achievement in their field of work.

Adventures Cross Country

Jun 27, 2014

Travel correspondent Tom Wilmer explores the programs of Adventures Cross-Country, which provides high school students with community service opportunities combined with learning and adventure travel programs to destinations in America and around the world.

Railtown Historic Park

May 30, 2014

Travel correspondent Tom Wilmer takes us to Railtown State Historic Park in Tuolumne County -- home to one of America's last operational railroad roundhouses, plus steam engines, diesel electrics, and scenic railway journeys through the Sierra foothills.

Travel Correspondent Tom Wilmer takes us on an exploration of Sonora and the surrounding area in Tuolomne County, with its rich history from the Gold Rush era and proximity to Yosemite.

Julie Henning

Travel Correspondent Julie Henning takes us to frozen Lake Winnebago

on the opening day of the Sturgeon spearing season. She watches as men and women cut through the ice to gain access to the giant prehistoric fish, which are heavily regulated due to a history of overfishing.

Visitor numbers on the rise in Santa Barbara

Feb 24, 2014
Flickr member Damian Gadal

The amount of money spent at local lodging facilities in the City of Santa Barbara saw its largest increase in several years last month with a significant 23.8 percent bump. 

This year-over-year increase in visitor spending helped generate $991,834 in revenue for the city through its 12 percent Transient Occupancy Tax (TOT), the vast majority of which goes into the general fund. A smaller portion of the TOT is set aside for creek restoration and water quality improvements.