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In a webinar Sept. 2, the UCSB Economic Forecast Project gave an update on current health and economic conditions for Santa Barbara County.

New research led by scientists at UC Santa Barbara and the University of Washington suggests Western wildfires are likely to intensify over the next 10 years before experiencing a gradual decline.

Courtesy: Nature

The Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics (KITP) at UC Santa Barbara is hosting a new virtual series called The Art of Doing Science.

KITP is a world-renowned physics institute that welcomes scientists from around the world every year to collaborate and do physics.

Lars Bildsten is the director of KITP and a professor in the UCSB Physics Department. He said there is no other institute in the world where scientists come together at this scale.

National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)

Researchers at the University of California, Santa Barbara have made a breakthrough in using gene-editing CRISPR-Cas9 technology to create sterile male Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

Erika Mahoney

On this edition of Issues & ideas, you’ll hear about the UC Santa Barbara marine scientists who are currently on an international expedition to help them understand how the ocean will respond to climate change. The western monarch butterfly’s population has declined 99% percent since the 1980s, but you can learn to help them recover in your own garden. We’ll hear from Santa Barbara emergency physician Dr. Jason Prystowsky about what could be done to foster trust between marginalized communities and medical institutions. Father Ian takes us with him as he learns about Olive leaf Tea. Finally, members of The Molly Ringwald Project, a popular local 80s dance band, talk about performing again after the pandemic.

Photo: Deborah Steinberg / NASA.gov

UC Santa Barbara marine scientists are currently on an international expedition to study the ocean’s carbon cycle. The scientists say the data will help them to understand how the ocean is going to respond to climate change.

Cover Photo: Prashanth Vishwanathan/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Researchers from the University of California at Santa Barbara have published the most extensive analysis to date on groundwater infrastructure across the globe. Their research calls attention to the high number of wells at risk for running dry, including along the Central Coast.

Beth Thornton

UC Santa Barbara issued travel guidelines during spring break and testing requirements before students return to campus.

City of SB CWPP

 

California's 2020 wildfire season burned more than four million acres and broke numerous records for increased size and intensity, according to a recent report from the state’s Forest Management Task Force.

Issues & Ideas: Hwy 1 repairs, STEM, the Son Care Foundation, and a first time filmmaker.

Mar 3, 2021
photo courtesy of Cal Poly Theatre and Dance Dept.

Repair work has begun on a section of Highway 1 on Big Sur’s south coast after a debris flow washed out both lanes. You’ll learn about local businesses that have remained closed for almost a year. UCSB’s student-run radio station KCSB reports on a new effort to bring people of color into STEM fields. Son Care Foundation, a local nonprofit organization, rehabilitates young men using the human-canine bond. A new theatre production from Cal Poly students is all about being at home. Finally, the SLO International Film Festival starts next week, and you’ll hear from a first time film maker about her journey from concept to screen.

Photo from UCSB

Experts say efficient testing and tracing are key components to limiting the spread of COVID-19. With this in mind, UC Santa Barbara has opened a certified clinical COVID lab on campus for students, faculty and staff.

Issues & Ideas: Alzheimer's research, farmworker vaccinations and expanding inclusion

Feb 2, 2021

50 agricultural workers receive the COVID-19 vaccine at their workplace in Fresno, which advocates say is the best way to ensure all farmworkers get vaccinated. Governor Gavin Newsom has had mixed success modernizing state bureaucracy in the last two years. You’ll hear from a UCSB neuroscientist about a research project aimed at understanding Alzheimer's. Also, we’ll get an update from Michelle Call of GALA Pride and Diversity Center on the ways the organization has become more inclusive. And finally, you’ll get a closer look at the work being done at SLO’s Transitions Mental Health Association.

In keeping with California’s goal towards carbon neutrality, the state is giving Isla Vista money to pay for new, clean transportation in low-income areas.

Issues & Ideas: Local election coverage, SLO real estate and Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes

Oct 21, 2020

Continuing KCBX's election coverage, we hear from Dawn Addis, one of the candidates hoping to represent the Central Coast in the state Assembly. And learn more about the two men running to represent the Central Coast in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reporter Harry Lawton of KCSB spoke to Santa Barbara County's election official. The U.S. Census Bureau has finished counting for the 2020 Census, and you’ll hear two experts weigh in on what happens next and why some people are concerned if the Census Bureau will produce an accurate count. Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have developed a whale alert system for transiting vessels, hoping to keep whales from being struck by cargo vessels. On this week’s “Working Lunch” we have a conversation about the local real estate market. And finally, on “The Nonprofit Story,” we learn about the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center.

UCSB SRC

Archivists at UC Santa Barbara are documenting the pandemic’s effect on the university’s community. To do so, they’ve asked students, staff, faculty and alumni to send in submissions, without any guidance on form or content.

And so far, UCSB’s Special Research Collections have received nearly 100 submissions.

Sarah York Rubin

If you head to the beach in Santa Barbara this summer, you might stumble upon an outdoor display by world-renowned artist Tom Fruin. His brightly-colored sculptures, made of reclaimed plexiglass, bring a new perspective to common shapes and designs.

On this episode of Issues & Ideas, emergency relief for undocumented immigrants recently became available in California, but demand outweighs the supply of cash. We’ll learn how the California NanoSystems Institute at UCSB is repurposing 3D printers to make face shields for healthcare workers. And hear about the challenges facing small farmers in California due to COVID-19. We get an update on First 5 SLO County from director Wendy Wendt; the independent public agency, created by California’s Proposition 10, uses a tax on tobacco products to fund programs for children through age five and their families. The city manager of Morro Bay, Scott Collins, talks about having to discourage vacationers due to the pandemic. And finally, we’ll learn about an award-winning book by UCSB professor emeritus Tonia Shimin featuring the art of her late father, Symeon Shimin.

The California NanoSystems Institute at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a place where engineers, scientists and students make prototypes for their projects —often using 3D printers. Dave Bothman, the lab manager, has lately been using the printers to make face shields for healthcare workers.

www.diablocanyonpanel.com

While there are still no confirmed coronavirus cases in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties, the spreading COVID-19 outbreak is now interrupting daily life on the Central Coast.

Courtesy Mental Health Services Oversight & Accountability Commission

Trying to improve mental health services for California students, a group of young people from around the state recently met up in Santa Barbara to come up with new ideas. And it included students and mental health advocates from across the Central Coast.

On this week’s Issues & Ideas, we get a tour of a former military facility off the coastal highway in Big Sur. It's been off-limits to the public until now, and it’s full of Cold War secrets. Also, we get to know JooWan Kim, the composer and pianist behind an avant-garde hip-hop orchestra from Oakland called Mik Nawooj.

"Quantum supremacy" achieved on the Central Coast

Oct 24, 2019
National Institute of Standards and Technology

Google announced this week it has achieved a historic technology breakthrough on the Central Coast, by creating “quantum supremacy.” Working with a team from the University of California at Santa Barbara, the company says it has solved a next-to-impossible mathematical problem in record time, and it could change human understanding of what computers can do.

CDC

Following a measles quarantine of hundreds of students at Los Angeles universities, Central Coast health officials are on high alert, they say. Since January, over 700 cases of measles have been reported in 22 states.

Issues & Ideas: SLO growth, economic vitality and wildflowers

Mar 20, 2019

On this week's Issues & Ideas, we hear about the Hourglass Project, a new economic vitality venture aimed at bringing future jobs and industries to San Luis Obispo County. We'll also hear two sides of the ongoing conversation about downtown San Luis Obispo, and what should be done to encourage a wide-range of businesses while nurturing the city's unique characteristics. UCSB neuroscientist Kenneth Kosik talks about studying a genetic mutation that causes early-onset Alzheimer's disease, and our colleagues at KCRW explore what's behind California's current wildflower super bloom, and where you can see carpets of spring flowers. 

Issues & Ideas: Planes, pedicabs, and Alaine Locke

Feb 6, 2019
KCBX News

On this week's Issues & Ideas, we meet a Cal Poly aerospace engineering professor who has designed aircraft that hold nine world speed records. He's part of a team traveling the world for the 2019 Red Bull Air Race Championship. We speak to the newest member of the Grover Beach City Council, appointed to the city's governing body during the first city council meeting she ever attended. January 28 marked the 50th anniversary of the Santa Barbara Oil Spill, and we have a report from commemorative event. Later, we talk with a San Luis Obispo woman who launched a pedicab business, and says a fleet of the human-powered vehicles could help solve some of San Luis Obispo's traffic and parking issues. And we'll get to know the UCSB professor who recently won the National Book Award for his biography of Alain Locke, the famous "Dean" of the Harlem Renaissance.

Amarica Rafanelli/KCBX

UC Santa Barbara has broken ground on a new student farm, in an effort to address on-campus food insecurity.

UCSB research collaboration focuses on Montecito debris flow survivors

Oct 4, 2018
Greta Mart/KCBX

It’s been just about nine months since the Montecito Debris Flow killed 23 people and destroyed homes, bridges and roadways. Now that the immediate pain of the disaster has abated a bit, but before too much time passes that people start forgetting, a group of researchers at UC Santa Barbara are studying the disaster in a coordinated effort.

Join host Brian Reynolds as he discusses neuroscience and neuroengineering with Dr. Bridget Queenan, Neuroscientist and Associate Director of UCSB’s Brain Initiative and Research Director of the UCSB Nanolab. Dr. Q discusses the highly creative work in the STEM professions and how public tax dollars investing in science and technology provide cures, solutions, and discoveries that make us safe, strong, and happy.

UCSB gets new BIFROST laser facility

Jul 3, 2018
David Weld/UCSB

In Norse mythology, the Bifrost is the rainbow bridge connecting the realm of the gods to Earth. At the University of California at Santa Barbara, it is also the name of a new laser facility.

CSU, UC among the winners in new California budget deal

Jun 9, 2018
Andrew Nixon/Capital Public Radio

Gov. Jerry Brown has repeatedly fought requests for more state funding for the University of California and California State University.

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