Women's March on Washington

Jennifer Moonjian

An estimated 100 women - and a few dozen men - walked from San Luis Obispo’s Meadow Park to downtown Wednesday morning, participating in the Day Without a Woman event. Many dressed in red, as requested by the national organizing group called the Women’s March, the same group that launched the January 21 Women’s March on Washington and sister marches around the globe. 

Andrew Robinson

On January 24, 2017, we invited three Central Coast millennials to the KCBX studio to hear their about their experience traveling to Washington DC for the weekend of January 19-22. They went to document the presidential inauguration and the Women's March on Washington. Moreover, the trio - two current Cal Poly students and one recent Cal Poly graduate - went with a mission; to make a short film on the events they witnessed and the people they met along the way.

Greta Mart

An estimated 10,000 women, men and children turned out Saturday to participate in the Women’s March San Luis Obispo. Another estimated 10,000 people attended the Santa Barbara march. Similar events took place around the world and in many U.S. cities; all were sister marches to the Women’s March on Washington, which attracted hundreds of thousands of people to the nation’s capitol one day after the presidential inauguration. 

On Issues & Ideas this week, we welcome three local women to the KCBX studio to talk about an upcoming event, an organized march in San Luis Obispo on January 21.

Like hundreds of smaller marches around the country, the Women's March San Luis Obispo is a sister march to the Women's March on Washington, happening on the day after Donald Trump's inauguration as president. Hundreds of thousands of people - not just women - are planning on making the trip to the nation's capitol to rally for human rights, equality and justice. For those who can't make the trip to DC, local organizers have created an event here. It starts at 10 a.m. in Mitchell Park in downtown San Luis Obispo.