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Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the U.S.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep, David Greene, and Rachel Martin. These hosts often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel around the world to report on the news firsthand.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member Station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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When President Trump left the White House for the final time as president this morning, he stopped by to say a few words to reporters standing on the South Lawn. Those reporters included NPR's Franco Ordoñez, who's on the line. Franco, good morning.

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This is live Special Coverage from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C.

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The National Mall was largely empty of spectators today, blanketed instead by a colorful field of flags. But even as everyday Americans were absent from this year's inauguration, the capital swelled with 25,000 National Guard troops there. They're aimed at preventing a repeat of the violence we saw two weeks ago. Historian Kathleen Belew studies extremism and paramilitary and white power groups. She joins me now.

Welcome.

KATHLEEN BELEW: Thank you for having me.

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The night before their inauguration, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris stood near the Lincoln Memorial and marked more than 400,000 people killed by coronavirus.

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KAMALA HARRIS: And for many months, we have grieved by ourselves. Tonight, we grieve and begin healing together.

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It's going to be an uncommon Inauguration Day. That much we know for sure. One tradition they are keeping, though, is there will be entertainment.

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Bruce Springsteen, John Legend, Demi Lovato and these fellas...

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The faces of the incoming Biden administration's national security team came into focus today with Senate confirmation hearings. On deck were nominees for intelligence, defense, also foreign policy roles. Senators questioned the nominees on how their policies might differ from those of their predecessors. Among our reporters watching - NPR's national security correspondent Greg Myre and diplomatic correspondent Michele Kelemen.

Hello to you both.

MICHELE KELEMEN, BYLINE: Hi, Mary Louise.

GREG MYRE, BYLINE: Hi, Mary Louise.

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Filmmaker Ken Burns has spent his career documenting American history, and he always considered three major crises in the nation's past: the Civil War, the Depression and World War II.

Then came the unprecedented "perfect storm" of 2020 — and Burns thinks we may be living through America's fourth great crisis, and perhaps the worst one yet.

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We continue to remember some of the nearly 400,000 people we've lost to coronavirus in the U.S. We want to tell you about Florinda Flores from Roswell, N.M.

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