All Things Considered

Monday - Thursday, 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM; Friday 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations. Since then it has become the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly, and Ari Shapiro. During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators.

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

Ways to Connect

Author Interview: 'They Were Soldiers'

19 hours ago

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, Memorial Day is tomorrow - a day to honor and remember those who died in service to the country. We wanted to talk about a new book that takes a fresh look at the aftermath of the Vietnam War. And when people think of that war, it's often framed in terms of devastation - tens of thousands killed, many more wounded physically and emotionally. And, of course, there was the political turmoil.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, Memorial Day is tomorrow - a day to honor and remember those who died in service to the country. We wanted to talk about a new book that takes a fresh look at the aftermath of the Vietnam War. And when people think of that war, it's often framed in terms of devastation - tens of thousands killed, many more wounded physically and emotionally. And, of course, there was the political turmoil.

Your No-Stress Playlist: K'Naan

May 23, 2020

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And finally today, we're going to turn to our no-stress playlist. We've been building a list of songs you've told us bring you calm during these anxious times. Today's pick comes from Twitter user Courtney Strickland (ph) This is K'Naan's "Take A Minute."

Men's Soccer Returns In Germany

May 23, 2020

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

When will it be safe enough for sports to return? That's a question many fans have been asking throughout this pandemic. It's also a question that is extremely hard to answer for authorities and sports officials all over the world.

Long-Term Symptoms Of COVID-19

May 23, 2020

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Dr. Abraar Karan of Harvard Medical School and Catharine Hamm of the Los Angeles Times answer listener questions about traveling this summer.

Tips On How To Travel Safely This Summer

May 22, 2020

Dr. Abraar Karan of Harvard Medical School and Catharine Hamm of the Los Angeles Times answer listener questions about traveling this summer.

Living with the pandemic has been difficult for everyone: the isolation, the need to wear protective gear like masks and gloves, the adjustment to working or learning from home.

For those living with or caring for someone with severe autism, those challenges can be exponentially more difficult.

"Wearing gloves or masks, you know, things like that? That's just not going to happen here," says Feda Almaliti.

The Inglewood Army recruiting station is tucked into a strip mall in a gritty part of Los Angeles. Its neighbors are a liquor store, fast food outlets and palm trees. Inside are the familiar posters: smiling soldiers with the slogans "Army Strong" and "Army Team."

Sergeant First Class Nathan Anslow runs this station. He points to something new just inside the door. A stack of questionnaires — coronavirus screening forms. It's the first stop for potential recruits.

Lee Konitz, Bucky Pizzarelli, Ellis Marsalis, Wallace Roney and Henry Grimes are just a few of the jazz greats who have died in recent months from complications due to the coronavirus. Hear WBGO and Jazz Night in America's Christian McBride talk to about the toll the pandemic has taken on the jazz community, and read WBGO's Nate Chinen on the pain of grieving lost musicians during Jazz Appreciation Month in April.

The Washington Post's fashion critic Robin Givhan answers listener questions about the impact of the coronavirus on the fashion industry.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with special education teacher Anna Jones and school administrator Wayne Stewart about how the coronavirus pandemic has changed their work as educators.

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with special education teacher Anna Jones and school administrator Wayne Stewart about how the coronavirus pandemic has changed their work as educators.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Since the pandemic started, 38.6 million Americans have filed for unemployment claims, according to new numbers announced Thursday.

That's more than one in five American workers using an unemployment insurance system first established decades ago to serve a very different population.

Rachel Portman has been scoring films since the 1980s, and in 1997 became the first woman ever to win an Oscar for best original score for her work on Douglas McGrath's Emma. Since then, Portman has scored dozens more films and TV shows, but is now stepping away from the screen with ask the river, her first album of music not written for a movie, TV show or stage production.

"There were hardly any female film composers," Portman says of winning an Oscar at that time.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

It's been a decade since celebrity pals Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon had their dueling impressions of Michael Caine go viral in the movie "The Trip."

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "THE TRIP")

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with Damona Hoffman, a host of the podcast Dates and Mates, about navigating the end of a relationship during the coronavirus pandemic.

A pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison and a medical director Dr. Wanjiku Njoroge answer children's questions about the coronavirus and living during the pandemic.

A pediatric nurse practitioner Suzannah Stivison and a medical director Dr. Wanjiku Njoroge answer children's questions about the coronavirus and living during the pandemic.

These days, it seems any morsel of good news about a coronavirus vaccine sends hopes — and markets — soaring.

The reality is, developing and producing a vaccine is an incredibly complicated process — one that is heavily reliant on global cooperation, says Prashant Yadav, a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development.

Last month the White House issued guidelines suggesting a way to reduce the number of false positive results in antibody tests: Run two tests. But that strategy has not yet been validated for coronavirus testing. And the details matter.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Wow, some difficult scenes there from Michigan - all right, let's bring in NPR science correspondent Allison Aubrey.

Hey there, Allison.

ALLISON AUBREY, BYLINE: Hey there.

Two-thirds of Americans do not expect their daily lives to return to normal for at least six months, and as states reopen, three-quarters are concerned that a second wave of coronavirus cases will emerge, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

"There's a great sense that normalcy is not around the corner," said Lee Miringoff, director of the Marist Institute for Public Opinion, which conducted the poll.

COVID-19 survivors share their stories of recovery, and Dr. Charles Vega, a family medicine doctor and clinical professor at the University of California, talks about treating patients.

Clinical assistant professor of psychiatry Dr. Jean Kim and artist Wendy MacNaughton answer listener questions about ways to relax during the pandemic.

COVID-19 survivors share their stories of recovery, and Dr. Charles Vega, a family medicine doctor and clinical professor at the University of California, talks about treating patients.

California led the nation in issuing a statewide stay-at-home order. But there's been an economic cost for going first — in the form of a $54 billion budget shortfall and unemployment projected to be as high as 25% this quarter.

"Those are Depression-era numbers and they're numbers that you'll see across this country," Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom tells All Things Considered. "By some estimates ... this has been the biggest shock we've seen in living memory."

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