civil rights

What do they want? The grievances of Generation Z activists are wide and varied—from racial injustice to policing, civil rights to gender rights, climate change to economic inequity. These are not their grandparents protests, but they are a continuation of their legacy and collective anger, sadness, frustration, fear, resolve and love. Reluctant Therapist Elizabeth Barrett and guest hosts Aaliyah Sade and Davied Gudiel have a conversation about the complexity and yet, simplicity, of the fight for social justice and claiming of the American Dream for all.

Randi Hair

The International Civil Rights Center & Museum preserves and showcases the legacy and significance of the Greensboro, North Carolina Woolworth sit-ins. Four young African American students at North Carolina A&T State University sat at a “whites only” counter inside the Woolworth restaurant on February 1, 1960. The nonviolent sit-in served as a major milestone of the civil rights movement and inspired sit-in demonstrations across the country. Correspondent Tom Wilmer visits with John Swaine, CEO at the International Civil Rights Center & Museum in downtown Greensboro.

How far have we traveled down the road to equality for all? In honor of Black History month and the contributions of African Americans in shaping the United States, listen for a conversation with host Elizabeth Barrett and her guests—a social activist in high school and a retired military veteran with ties to the civil rights movement—about their generational perspectives regarding the state of freedom and justice in America. They consider how we got here and where we’re going.

Becerra and Carbajal host Santa Barbara town hall

Aug 25, 2017
Courtesy of https://carbajal.house.gov/photos/

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and Central Coast congressman Rep. Salud Carbajal are hosting a town hall Saturday in Santa Barbara. Joining them will be California Assemblymember Monique Limon and California Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson. 

NAACP – A History

Jan 27, 2014

Founded over 100-years ago, the NAACP is seen as a vanguard civil rights organization.  But this institution was not the first to devote its efforts to advancing the cause of racial justice, as we learn from professor Susan Carle in her book, Defining the Struggle.