Kris Kington-Barker

Host of Central Coast Voices

Kris Kington-Barker has worked in healthcare fields ranging from mental health to hospital administration over the past 30 years and has served as a volunteer and board member for many central coast non-profit organizations.   She owns and operates a local business and, since 2006, has been providing private management consulting with a focus on strategic planning and leadership development for healthcare organizations and nonprofits.

Kris is currently the Executive Director for Hospice of San Luis Obispo, President of the board of the Long Term Care Ombudsman of SLO County and a member of ACTION for Health Communities. She became involved in radio in 1986 when she started hosting Health Matters for KVEC as a volunteer. Kris later hosted Voices on KCBX from 1999 to 2001, and now co-hosts Central Coast Voices with Fred Munroe.

Ways to Connect

 

  Voices of the Earth deals with the troubled relationship between humans and the natural world. Compiled by Charles Junkerman and Rush Rehm Voices of the Earth brings together some of the greatest environmental voices from across the centuries to celebrate the anniversary of Earth Day. With a cast of 90 different characters – poets, naturalists, scientists, politicos, deniers, and heroes, Voices of the Earth presents a kaleidoscope of views on the earth we inhabit, and the existential crisis we face.

Join host Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with Rush Rehm, Professor, Theater and Performance Studies, and Classics, Stanford University and Artistic Director, Stanford Repertory Theater (SRT), and Magnus Toren, Executive Director of the Henry Miller Memorial Library in Big Sur about this inspiring work and its call to action.

 

Each year, National Equal Pay Day reflects how far into the current year women must work to match what men earned in the previous year. Due to a gender gap in pay, it takes women an extra three months of wages to make up the difference. On average, women working full time and year-round are paid 82 cents for every dollar paid to a man who works full time and year-round. The wage gap is even greater for most women of color.

Since 1970, the Community Environmental Council (CEC) has incubated and innovated real life environmental solutions that directly affect the California Central Coast. Their current work advances rapid and equitable solutions to the climate crisis – including ambitious zero carbon goals, drawdown of excess carbon, and protection against the impacts of climate change. At CEC, building community resilience is at the center of everything they do. 

The 27th Annual San Luis Obispo International Film Festival (SLOIFF) will be here soon and it will be one of our most unique Festivals ever — a predominantly virtual experience. This world-class annual festival, along with events throughout the year, provides a venue for international and local filmmakers, exposing an ever-expanding range of audiences to new ideas and experiences. This year’s film lineup will feature 111 presentations, including 30 feature films, 63 short films, and 18 music videos.

The Peace Academy of the Sciences and Arts of San Luis Obispo (PASA) vision is a community of lifelong learners who become competent caretakers and peace leaders for our world. To do this they have developed programs for students to strengthen individuality, seek their potential, and maximize their opportunity to learn and contribute. Join Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with members of The Peace Academy of the Sciences and Arts of San Luis Obispo (PASA)—Sandra Sarrouf, PASA teacher, cultural worker and founder of Cultural Creations; and Dara Stepanek, PASA teacher, integrative nutrition coach, and restaurant owner. They will discuss the mission of PASA to inspire a deep understanding of self and others through a learning culture that celebrates creative innovation, enriched collaborative experiences, and connection through core human values.

As of today, the COVID-19 pandemic has killed over 400,000 people in the U.S. and while hope is on the arisen, with two vaccines currently being distributed, the virus is still considered to be “widespread” on the Central Coast, with hundreds of new infections reported daily. So, what should you do if you come down with the virus? Is it okay to go to the doctor? The hospital? How safe is the vaccine? And, how can you make an appointment to get vaccinated? 

Across the globe, businesses of all sizes are recognizing that supportive policies and practices increase organizational productivity, while also boosting the physical and emotional health of employees and their families. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the overlapping lines between work and life, and provides a unique opportunity to consider how family-friendly options may be incorporated at businesses everywhere. Join host Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with Wendy Wendt, executive director of First 5 San Luis Obispo County; Maggie Payne, program director with Atascadero Children’s Center; and Molly Kern, director of governmental affairs with San Luis Obispo Chamber of Commerce. In the second part of the program, Kris will be talking with Kelly Boss, HR director with IFixit; Zihad Naccascha, partner and cofounder of Carmel & Naccascha LLP; and Angela Toomey, HR director with Morris and Garritano.  They will explore the many benefits of family-friendly workplace policies, and identify opportunities for change.

In November, the city of San Luis Obispo released a draft Active Transportation Plan for public review. Over the past two years, staff have been engaging with the community to develop this plan—the first of its kind in the city—which will include both bicycling and walking needs. Join Kris Kington Barker and SLO active transportation manager Adam Fukushima and sustainability manager Chris Read,  as they discuss the proposed strategy for increasing bicycling and walking in San Luis Obispo and opportunities for the community to share their thoughts.

The COVID-19 crisis has led to widespread economic impacts. Rising unemployment has left a record number of individuals in possible housing insecurity due to loss of income as a result of shelter-at-home orders, quarantines, illness, school closures, and other COVID-related factors. In August, nine prominent institutes and organizations released new research that concluded that 30-40 million people in America are at risk of losing their homes by the end of 2020. What type of housing assistance is available during these difficult times? Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with Central Coast legal experts—Kate Lee, attorney with Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County, and Sadie Weller, attorney with San Luis Obispo Legal Assistance Foundation—as they discuss avenues available for rent and mortgage relief as a result of the COVID-19 crisis.

Data shows that immigrants are among those hardest hit by the impacts of COVID-19. In California, undocumented immigrants represent 10% of the workforce, and paid approximately $2.5 billion in state and local taxes in 2019. Immigrants do the essential work that sustains us all, yet they have been excluded from many of the federal COVID-19 relief assistance programs. Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with guests working as part of the collaborative effort with SLO County UndocuSupport and 805 Undocufund—Joel Diringer, San Luis Obispo County community health advocate; Genevieve Flores-Haro, associate director of the Mixteco/Indígena Community Organizing Project; Erica Ruvalcaba-Heredia, program director for the Center for Family Strengthening and Promotores Collaborative of SLO County; and Mariana Gutierrez, Family Resource Center program supervisor with Community Action Partnership of SLO County (CAPSLO)—as they discuss how to to provide financial relief to meet the basic and emergency needs of immigrants.

Coping with the COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for all families, but for families caring for children with disabilities, it can be especially challenging. According to the last US Census Report, one in every 26 American families reported raising children with a disability. How are they coping? What resources are there for them in the community? Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with Kaycie Roberts, executive director with the Central Coast Autism Spectrum Center, member of the San Luis Obispo County Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) Community Advisory Committee and parent of a child with autism; April Lewallen, board chair of the Central Coast Autism Spectrum Center and V.P. with PathPoint' and Rebekah Koznek, parent and chair of the Community Advisory Committee (C.A.C.) with SELPA, as they discuss how they are coping during the pandemic.

Voting is now underway for the 2020 General Election. This election will be like no other in U.S. history. So far, more than 5 million people across the U.S have already voted early in the presidential election. What do you need to know to vote safely and be sure your vote is counted? What options are there available for voting locally? How can you make sure that your absentee ballot is delivered and counted?

Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with guests about the 2020 election: in the first half hour with Tommy Gong, San Luis Obispo County Clerk Recorder, and in the second half hour with members of The League of Women Voters (LWV) of San Luis Obispo County— Julie Rodelwald  and Juliane McAdam. They will talk about the purpose of the LWV, commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment this year, and importance of LWV efforts to Get Out The Vote.

 

The coronavirus pandemic has exposed and intensified systematic racism in many of our institutions. In August the National Urban League reported that Black Americans are infected with COVID-19 at nearly three times the rate of white Americans.  Research suggests that Black Americans, and other communities of color, appear to be at greater risk of serious illness and death from COVID-19 due to a history of racism that creates differences in health and access to care and other resources needed for good health. 

Depression and anxiety continue to rise as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. As the virus continues across the U.S. it has created a level of isolation not previously seen before. Fear for our health, and that of family and friends, financial strain, food shortages, and much more brought on by the pandemic, can bring extraordinary stress into our daily lives. A Kaiser Family Foundation poll conducted in July 2020 found more than half of U.S. adults reported their mental health has been negatively impacted due to worry and stress over the coronavirus, an increase of 20% from when the same question was asked in March 2020. 

One of the many untold effects of the COVID-19 pandemic is the toll it is taking on patients without the coronavirus. During the initial wave of COVID cases, staying home was universally urged to protect people from exposure to the infection, but, in the process, many people ignored serious medical issues that should have sent them to their provider or an emergency room. 

While you may not be able to leisurely peruse the shelves of your local library right now, it doesn’t mean the library still can’t be your haven during the COVID-19 pandemic. Libraries have quickly changed how, where and when they offer services amongst the continuing pandemic, finding ways to allow the community to access the myriad of valuable resources they have to offer. Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with San Luis Obispo County Libraries' Christopher Barnickel, Chase McMunn, Aracelli Astorga and Sharon Coronado as they discuss how County of SLO Public Libraries are working to support communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Despite the raging COVID-19 pandemic, this is not just an election year, but also a very important year for everyone to participate and be counted as part of the 2020 U.S. Census. Due to the pandemic, both of these civic duties have become more complicated. Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks in the first half hour with Tommy Gong, San Luis Obispo County Clerk-Recorder, and Michael Latner, Ph.D., Cal Poly political science professor and Kendall Voting Rights Fellow at the Union of Concerned Scientists, as they discuss the integrity of the 2020 election and plans to make voting safe and accessible to everyone. In the second half hour, Kris speaks with representatives from local organizations, who amid COVID-19, are working to prevent an undercount in the 2020 Census within 'hard-to-reach' communities. Guests include Devon McQuade, development and communications coordinator with the 5Cities Homeless Coalition; Brandy Graham, veteran support programs manager with CAPSLO; and Micki Wright, a senior volunteer services representative.

For weeks following the death of George Floyd and during the protests that have followed, activists across the country have called on community leaders to “defund the police.” But what does this really mean? And is this the solution that we need? Why do we as a community need to rethink public safety?

The economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Central Coast businesses has been immense. Results from a survey issued to local business owners by the San Luis Obispo Chamber of Commerce suggest severe impacts on the business community due to COVID-19 lockdowns. Join host Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with Jim Dantona, president and CEO of the San Luis Obispo Chamber of Commerce and Jocelyn Brennan, president and CEO of the South County Chambers of Commerce, about the business and economic implications of the coronavirus pandemic for the Central Coast. They will discuss their efforts to assist businesses and organizations weather the closure, navigating confusing HR issues, and help businesses prepare for a safe, successful, and sustainable reopening of the economy.

COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting vulnerable populations, including the LGBTQ+ community. According to research, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer Americans are more likely to become unemployed as a result of the coronavirus epidemic. Join host Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with guests Michelle Call and David Weisman of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance (GALA), and Jamie Woolf, chair of Tranz Central Coast, as they discuss how the COVID-19 pandemic is impacting the LGBTQ+ community of the Central Coast, and how Pride is shifting it’s a celebration this year. 

Child care is essential to the economic vitality of any city. Unfortunately, like many businesses and organizations, child care providers are suffering greatly from the COVID-19 pandemic.  Join Kris Kington-Barker as she speaks with several guests—Shana Paulson, children services manager with CAPSLO Child Care Resource Connection; Raechelle Bowlay, CAPSLO'S quality early learning manager and Child Care Planning Council coordinator; Monica Grant, CEO of the San Luis Obispo County YMCA; Kim Love, director of Bright Life Playschool in San Luis Obispo; and Jamie Sanbonmatsu, director of Valley View Children’s Center in Arroyo Grande and member of the We Are the Care Initiative—about the continuing need for child care in the community and the challenges providers face in re-opening amid the pandemic:

Join Kris Kington Barker as she speaks with Heidi McPherson, CEO with the Community Foundation of San Luis Obispo County, Garret Olson, COVID-19 emergency operations manager with the SLO Food Bank, Lisa Fraser, executive director with the LINK Family Resource Center and the Center for Family Strengthening, and Janna Nichols, executive director with the Five Cities Homeless Coalition. They will be talking about the struggle of nonprofits to help meet the basic needs of the community as well as what a global depression could mean for their organizations and the local populations they help.

Nursing homes have been ravaged by coronavirus throughout the nation. Data shows that people who reside or work in long-term care facilities have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19, and a new report shows that as of April 23, 2020 there have been over 10,000 reported deaths due to COVID-19 in long-term care facilities (including residents and staff), in the 23 states that publicly report death data, representing 27% of deaths due to COVID-19 in those states.  So how is the Central Coast responding to the threat of COVID-19 in local long-term care facilities? What is being done to protect both residents and employees? And what is the future of nursing homes?

Many nonprofits are already feeling the strain of the COVID-19 pandemic: increases in demand for services, health and safety concerns, and volunteer shortages. Canceled fundraising events, shutdowns and an economy in turmoil due to the crisis have led to a decrease in revenue. These effects are likely to continue for some time and may even worsen, while for many nonprofits, the needs of their clients continue to grow. How are local nonprofits meeting the demands? How will they survive when they are most needed? What resources are available to help?

The United States has lost 10% of its workforce as a result of the COVID-19 global pandemic. Newest reports show that almost 17 million Americans filed jobless claims in the last three weeks. With the economy in a coma, small business owners and workers are struggling to find ways to survive. Are there ways for businesses to get help during the crisis? What are some innovative approaches that companies can use to stay afloat?

The outbreak of the COVID-19 virus is stressful to the community in numerous ways. Individuals may have fear and anxiety about catching the virus for either themselves or their loved ones. People may be experiencing loneliness from isolation due to the stay-at-home orders. And many individuals may have increased worry due to the economic repercussions of the pandemic. How will their business survive? How will they pay their mortgage or rent? How can they get food for their family? The coronavirus can significantly affect mental health for everyone, but especially for those who already suffer from mental illness. How are these individuals able to continue treatment?

As coronavirus cases in the world and the U.S continue to soar, we will talk with local experts about what you need to know to stop the spread, stay safe, get tested and how prepared we are to fight this outbreak, as well as what are the political implications of this pandemic for the U.S.

 

Have you ever wondered how people persevere despite roadblocks and obstacles? The Resiliency Project seeks to learn how people experience setbacks, opposition, and oppression while retaining (or ultimately regaining) mental and physical well-being.

Court Appointment Special Advocates (CASA) of San Luis Obispo County has been serving foster youth in San Luis Obispo County for over 25 years. They advocate for the best interest of children who have been removed from their parents because of abuse or neglect. At any given time, there can be up to 500 foster youth under the jurisdiction of the juvenile court, and CASA has dedicated, caring volunteers working with at least half of these children to be a consistent presence in their life and advocating for the best interests of these abused and neglected children within the court system. That leaves more than 200 children still waiting for help from CASA.

French Hospital Medical Center’s Beyond Health campaign will redefine the health care experience for our community and lead us into the future. By doubling the capacity through a $130 million campaign, the medical center can grow with our community and provide the most advanced technologies patients deserve. Listen in and learn what this transformative expansion will include, and how it will impact the health of Central Coast residents.

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