Salinas

TASER AXON body

Several Monterey County police departments are moving forward with body camera technology to help document specific on-duty officer interactions with the public.

This week, Greenfield became the first department in the county to institute the technology. King City, Soledad and Salinas are expected to follow soon.

Salinas Police Chief Kelly McMillan says his department—by far the largest of any Central Coast police department—will purchase as many as 125 cameras.

Flickr member Rennett Stowe

A new survey by the State Water Board shows the Santa Maria River is highly toxic—and has been for years with some of the highest readings in the state for certain chemicals.

Bryn Phillips is an environmental toxicology specialist with UC Davis who has been working on this ongoing project. He says an increase in pyrethroid pesticide levels is cause for concern.

Recently the river was designated with a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) restriction.

Flickr member Chris Potter

Several Costco stores along the Central Coast will soon need to update their refrigerator systems under a company settlement with the Environmental Protection Agency.

Costco will pay $335 million in penalties for federal Clean Air Act violations and will fix refrigerant leaks, among other improvements, the agency said in a media release.

Hartnell College

Aug 29, 2014

Broadcast date: 8/27/14

 

We will continue our series of conversations with the leaders of the Central Coast’s public colleges and universities. This week KCBX, News Director, Randol White, speaks with Dr. Willard Lewallen about the challenges Hartnell College in Salinas is facing and the school’s plans for the future

Allan Hancock College

Several Central Coast community colleges started their Fall class schedules Monday including Allan Hancock College in northern Santa Barbara County, Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo County and Hartnell College in Salinas.

Hancock is reporting an 8.5 percent jump in first time students and an overall increase of 0.6 percent.

At Cuesta, nearly 700 recent high school graduates in the county are taking advantage of the school's new Promise Program that provides a fee-free first semester. The college estimates that to be a $700 value.

Silicon Valley draws thousands of young programmers hoping to strike it rich in the tech industry. Problem is, it's a rather exclusive club, favoring top-notch graduates from prestigious universities. But a new program in the Salinas Valley is challenging that formula, by helping the children of farm working families become programmers and engineers -- in just three years.

The California’s Report's Education Reporter Ana Tintocalis says a lot is on the line for these students…and their families.

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